Accounting (ACC)
  
ACC 105 Taxation for Individuals (3)
An introduction to federal income taxation emphasizing the preparation of personal tax returns. Fundamentals of income, exclusions, deductions, credits, and tax minimization strategies.

ACC 201 Financial Accounting (3)
Basic accounting principles and procedures with a focus on the sole proprietorship and partnership form of business. The accounting cycle, receivables, payables, inventory, fixed asset acquisition, and disposal, and financial statement preparation.

ACC 202 Managerial Accounting (3)
A continuation of ACC 201 with a concentration on the corporate form of organization. Topics include stockholders' equity, long-term debt, investments, statements of cash flow, financial statement analysis, and an introduction to managerial accounting. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 203 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
An in-depth study of various aspects of financial statements prepared according to generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include a review of basic accounting theory and practice, the development of accounting standards, the conceptual framework of accounting, the treatment of cash, receivables, prepaid expenses, fixed assets, and intangibles. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201 and ACC 202.

ACC 204 Intermediate Accounting II (3)
A continuation of ACC 203, Intermediate Accounting I. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, investments, income taxes, compensation (salaries, bonuses, stock plans, post-retirement benefits) changes, correction of errors, and earnings per share. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201 and ACC 202.

ACC 220 Microcomputer Accounting Systems (3)
Introduction to actual computerized accounting systems being used in the business world. Emphasis is on the application of basic accounting theory using a case study approach. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 261 Governmental Accounting (3)
An introduction to accounting and financial reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Includes a study of fund and budget accounts for state and local governmental units, revenues, appropriations, disbursements, assessments, university, hospital, and other fund applications. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 290 Certified Bookkeeper Course (3)
This is a capstone course that is to be taken in the final semester of the AAS degree in Accounting program. Students focus systematically on mastering the curriculum for national certification as a professional bookkeeper. Specific topics include adjusting entries, correction of errors, payroll, depreciation, inventory, and internal controls. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201 and ACC 202. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Agricultural Science (AGSC)
  
AGSC 100 Elements of Livestock Production (3)
Fundamental concepts in care, management, and economics of food producing animals. Includes contributions of the Nevada and U.S. animal industries in providing food on an international basis. (Formerly ANSC 100.)

AGSC 101 Agriculture Orientation (0.5)
A survey of the agriculture industry examining different jobs, working conditions, employment structure, and employee-employer relationships. Each student will begin to build a personal job portfolio to include a resume, references, and cover letter for job applications. Student will learn skills that will assist them in accomplishing their collegiate goals. (Formerly AGR 100, Agriculture Orientation)

AGSC 102 Agriculture Communication and Organization (1-3)
Designed for students interested in pursuing an agriculture career. Prepares students for leadership positions on the college campus and throughout the community. Includes leadership skill development including communication, leadership roles, and proper administration of Robert's Rules of Order, delegation, responsibility, time management, evaluation, and goal setting. As this course offers variable credit, students must complete fifteen (15) contact hours for one credit, thirty (30) contact hours for two credits, and forty-five (45) contact hours for three credits for their respective credit hour(s). This is a repeatable course to a total of six credit hours. (Formerly AGR 105)

AGSC 105 Livestock Production Systems (3)
Designed to instruct students in the various essential production systems in animal agriculture. These systems will include all aspects of production including reproduction, nutrition, animal preventative maintenance, treatment delivery systems of animal health, and environment. Consumer related issues will be discussed, as they relate to the production of animal agriculture. (Formerly ANSC 105.) Prerequisite: Must have completed AGSC 100.

AGSC 110 Introduction to Agriculture Management (3)
Introduces agriculture management and will focus on the development of personal leadership skills as they relate to agriculture business. Students will investigate, develop, and demonstrate personal leadership skills as related to critical agriculture issues on the regional, state, and national levels. (Formerly AGR 110, Introduction to Agriculture Management)

AGSC 111 Agribusiness Credit and Finance (3)
This course covers types of loans and sources of credit used in agribusinesses. Financial analysis of farm and ranch operations including costs of credit, future and present value techniques, evaluation of agricultural investments, and financial capital markets and leasing is discussed. Recommended prerequisite: AGSC 110.

AGSC 122 Intercollegiate Rodeo (2)
Course designed for men and women interested in rodeo as a knowledgeable spectator, producer, or participant. Lecture includes rodeo history, current rules, equipment use, and physical and mental conditioning. (Formerly ANSC 122B, Intercollegiate Rodeo.) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

AGSC 163 Horsemanship (2)
Course will lay the foundation for good, basic, and effective horsemanship that can later be developed into more specialized riding. Topics include safety, handling, grooming, saddling, stabling, feeding, health, exercise, and riding. All levels of ability welcome as lab assignments are tailored to the skill levels of both student and horse. (Formerly ANSC 163.)

AGSC 198 Special Topics in Agriculture (1-6)
Selected agricultural topics offered for general interest in the agricultural community. Not a program requirement. No prerequisite. Repeatable to a maximum of nine credits. (Formerly AGR 198)

AGSC 201 Agricultural Issues (3)
Students will investigate current topics causing change in the agriculture industry. Students will research and report on trends as diverse as animal rights, chemical and foods, land use, water rights, and governmental subsidies as well as regional, state, and national topics. (Formerly AGR 210)

AGSC 205 Rudimentary Farrier (2)
Introductory course in horseshoeing, including the physiology of the equine feet and legs, unsoundness, hoof care, shoeing equipment, and the actual shoeing of live horses. This course provides an individual with the skills to properly care and complete basic farrier work on their horses. (Formerly ANSC 205).

AGSC 206 Fundamentals of Animal Nutrition (3)
The science of animal nutrition is the basis for livestock feeding and nutrition. The fundamentals of digestion and absorption in both ruminants and non-ruminants are discussed. The nutritive value of feeds as they relate to the formulation of livestock rations will be emphasized including by-product feeding. (Formerly ANSC 211.)

AGSC 209 Physiology of Livestock Reproduction (3)
Designed to provide students with an understanding of the process of reproduction in cattle, sheep, swine, and horses. This course will provide information covering both the physical mechanics of reproduction as well as the endocrine system controlling livestock reproductive process. Various mating systems will be discussed with an emphasis placed on artificial insemination (A.I.) and embryo transfer (E.T.). (Formerly ANSC 209.) Prerequisite: Must also be enrolled in AGSC 210.

AGSC 210 Livestock Reproduction Lab (1)
Provides an understanding of the reproductive technologies in cattle, horses, and swine. Pregnancy detection and semen handling labs provide students with livestock experience. Various mating systems discussed with an emphasis on artificial insemination (A.I.) and embryo transfer (E.T.). A field trip component of the course focuses on A.I. techniques. (Formerly, ANSC 210.) Prerequisite: Must also be enrolled in AGSC 209.

AGSC 275 Animal Health and Sanitation (3)
A study of common beef, sheep, and horse diseases in our area. Special attention is given to sanitation, prevention, control, and eradication of diseases. Disease cause, symptoms, treatment, cure, and prevention will be addressed throughout all illnesses. (Formerly ANSC 275.)

AGSC 290 Cooperative Work Experience (1-6)
Students may earn college credit for work experience related to their college major and/or occupational goals. Students should meet with their Ag Faculty advisor to design an appropriate supervised, on-the-job, educationally directed work experience. Repeatable up to six credits. (Formerly AGR 290.) Prerequisite: Must have completed AGSC 110.

AGSC 413 Range-Livestock Interaction (3)
Emphasis on species and breed selection, physiological considerations, and alleviating detrimental effects on livestock with a review of interactions among livestock, wildlife, and plant communities. (Formerly ANSC 413.) Prerequisite: Must have completed AGSC 100 or BIOL 191.

AGSC 416 Agriculture Internship (1-6)
Coordinated work study programs in industry or government under the direction of a faculty member. Written progress reports are prepared periodically and at the conclusion of the internship. May be repeated up to six credits. (Formerly AGR 416.) Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or higher. Instructor permission required.

AGSC 496 Agriculture Capstone (3)
Advanced study in specialized area of agriculture management. Interdisciplinary topics within an emphasis area will be selected by student and academic advisor. Students will also produce a comprehensive portfolio. (Formerly AGR 496.) Prerequisite: Must have senior standing in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Agriculture Management emphasis area.

Applied Industrial Technology (AIT)
  
AIT 120 Basic Electrical for Technology (1-3)
Develop a basic understanding of DC and AC electricity in theory, and as it applies to Welding, Diesel, Industrial Millwright Technology, and Electrical Systems Technology.

American Sign Language (AM)
  
AM 145 American Sign Language I (4)
Development of American Sign Language and its application within the deaf community. Based on the functional, national approach to learning sign language and organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction. Aspects of the course include cultural awareness, grammatical features, vocabulary development, and conversational skills.

AM 146 American Sign Language II (4)
Continuation of AM 145 stressing the development of basic conversational skills. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 145.

AM 147 American Sign Language III (4)
Designed to enable students to develop conversational competency in American Sign Language. Grammatical features and sentence structures will be taught and practiced, as well as conversational norms for receptive and expressive language use. Topics relating to deaf history and culture will be discussed as they enable the student to more effectively communicate and associate with ASL users. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 146.

AM 148 American Sign Language IV (4)
The fourth in a series for American Sign Language courses designed for a student to acquire communicative competency in ASL. The course encourages the student to expand his/her command of discourse in ASL on various everyday topics. Linguistic features of ASL are expanded, including inflection, spatialization, movement, redundancy, and use of facial expression and body postures. Class will be conducted in ASL - no voice conversations will be allowed in the classroom. No chewing gum or eating during class. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 147.

AM 295 Drill and Practice in American Sign Language (0.5-4)
Practice and drill in American Sign Language. Repeatable up to four credits. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

AM 299 Special Topics in American Sign Language (3-6)
Development of Signing Exact English and its application within the deaf community. This process of learning sign language organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction. Aspects of the course include cultural awareness, vocabulary development and conversational skills.

Applied Mathematics and Science (AMS)
  
AMS 320 Science and Engineering in Technology (3)
Applications of the principles of physical science and engineering in technology. Combines concepts in physics, chemistry, and the environment for practical problem solving in business and industry. Excel spreadsheets will be used extensively. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or MATH 127 or MATH 128 or MATH 181 or MATH 182.

Anthropology (ANTH)
  
ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
Study of human cultures across the globe through examination of the basic principles underlying the organization of societies and the ways anthropologists analyze various parts of culture. Students will become familiar with the glue that holds all groups of people together, and how that glue can divide groups of people in profound ways.

ANTH 102 Physical Anthropology (3)
Introduction to the study of how humans, Homo sapiens, have emerged as a species and come to dominate the planet by examining processes of human biological and cultural evolution. Topics include inheritance, the emergence of primates, fossil hominids, the development of technology, and biological variability among modern humans. Satisfies general education science.

ANTH 201 Peoples and Cultures of the World (3)
Introduction to the diversity of indigenous, traditional societies in select regions of the world including such groups as herding people in Africa, hunters and gatherers in Australia, farmers in New Guinea, headhunters in Borneo, among others. The course focuses on the ethnographic description of traditional cultures and the impacts of colonization and globalization on those societies.

ANTH 202 Introduction to Archaeology (3)
Study of the archaeological patterns found in the Old and New Worlds and how archaeologists study the past. Focuses on topics like the cultural changes throughout the world as early humans began making tools in Africa to the rise of civilizations such as those found in Egypt and Mexico.

ANTH 400A Indians of North America (3)
Ethnographic survey of the wide variety of societies found in native North America, including regions such as the Plains, the Arctic, the Southwest, and the Southeast, among others. Course provides an overview of social institutions (i.e., religion, food getting and settlement, kinship, etc.) and changes resultant of European contact and colonization. Satisfies the diversity requirement at UNR. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 400B Indians of the Great Basin (3)
Study of indigenous cultures of the intermountain region of Western North America including such groups as the Washoe, the Western Shoshone, the Northern Paiute, and the Ute. Course provides an overview of social institutions (i.e., religion, food getting and settlement, kinship, etc.) and changes resultant of European contact and colonization. Satisfies diversity requirement at UNR. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 439 Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3)
Topic to be selected by the instructor and will reflect student needs. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 440A Archaeology of North America (3)
Survey of the archaeology of North America from the peopling of the continent more than 11,000 years ago to European colonization of North America. Course examines the diverse prehistoric lifeways of various regions including the Puebloan farmers, the Mississippian mound-builders, hunter-gatherer archaeology in the West, and the Euroamericans. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 440B Archaeology of the Great Basin (3)
Examines the prehistory of the Great Basin region, including the Paleoindian, Archaic periods, and later prehistoric occupations. Explores what kinds of data archaeologists use to construct culture histories and the environmental and social factors that influenced prehistoric patterns. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 448A Field School in Archaeology (3-8)
Students will participate in archaeological survey and/or excavation. Students will work on archaeological sites in the vicinity of Elko, Nevada, in the heart of the Great Basin, to learn how archaeologists do field work and what principles underlie different types of field strategies. Students must apply for enrollment in this course. Form available from the Social Science Department Office, EIT building. May be repeated up to 10 credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106. Instructor permission required.

ANTH 459 Selected Topics in Archaeology (3)
Topic to be selected by the instructor and will reflect student needs. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 102 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106.

Art (ART)
  
ART 100 Visual Foundations (3)
A beginning art class that includes a survey of art and the basic components of design. The class explores visual concepts as they relate to the history of art through class presentations, discussions, and a variety of media. Students should plan for three hours of studio work outside the class. [F*]

ART 101 Drawing I (3)
A disciplined foundation in drawing concepts based on visual observation skills. [F*]

ART 102 Drawing II (3)
A continuation of ART 101. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 101.

ART 106 Jewelry I (3)
Techniques of various metal construction for jewelry. Emphasis on design and craftsmanship. [F]

ART 107 Design Fundamentals I (2-D) (3)
Explores the fundamentals of design using various media focusing on 2-D design. [F*]

ART 108 Design Fundamentals II (3-D) (3)
Creative design with emphasis on volume and space relationships in a variety of materials. [F]

ART 111 Beginning Ceramics (3)
Introductory and intermediate course in beginning ceramics. May repeat course up to six credits. [F]

ART 115 Beginning Clay Sculpture (3)
Introduction to design and creation of sculpture with clay. [F]

ART 124 Introduction to Printmaking (3)
Introduction to the traditional printmaking processes. [F] [S/U]

ART 127 Watercolor I (3)
Introduction to watercolor techniques and concepts. Requires three hours of studio practice weekly. [F]

ART 135 Photography I (3)
Analytical and critical approaches to the creative possibilities of photography including basic photographic techniques and materials. [F]

ART 141 Introduction to Digital Photography (3)
An introduction to the aspects of digital photography. Explores how to improve photographic skills and integration of photography and the digital media. [F]

ART 142 Introduction to Digital Photography II (3)
A continuation of Digital Photography. Employs further investigation of the digital media and current version of Photoshop. Repeatable up to six credits. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 141.

ART 160 Art Appreciation (3)
Introduction to the visual arts, illustrating the place of art in its social and cultural setting. [H*]

ART 201 Life Drawing I (3)
Introduction to drawing from live models. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 101.

ART 206 Jewelry II (3)
Continued exploration of creating jewelry using various techniques. [F]

ART 211 Ceramics I (3)
A beginning studio course in construction and decoration of clay. Slab, coil, and wheel-thrown techniques will be taught. [F]

ART 212 Ceramics II (3)
Continuation of ART 111 with emphasis on development of individual expression in clay. [F]

ART 216 Sculpture I (3)
Introduction to sculpting techniques and concepts. [F]

ART 227 Watercolor II (3)
Continued exploration of watercolor techniques and concepts. [F]

ART 231 Painting I (3)
Exploration of various painting media and concepts. [F]

ART 232 Painting II (3)
Continuation of exploration of painting techniques and concepts. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 231.

ART 235 Photography II (3)
Lecture/study with emphasis on improving basic and intermediate skills. Explores the use of photography as a personal expression. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 135.

ART 243 Digital Imaging I (3)
Introduction to computer based imaging. Also available as GRC 183. [F]

ART 260 Survey of Art History I (3)
Presentation of the historical context of major and minor works of art from the ancient world to the Renaissance, art analysis, and criticism. [H*]

ART 261 Survey of Art History II (3)
A continuation of Survey of Art History I presenting major and minor works of art from the Renaissance to the present, art analysis, and criticism. [H*]

ART 297 Field Study (1-3)
A study of art in its cultural and historical setting. May repeat course up to six credits. [H]

ART 299 Special Topics in Studio Art (0.5-3)
Consideration of special topics and issues in art. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. May repeat course up to 12 credits. [S/U]

Astronomy (AST)
  
AST 101 General Astronomy (3)
An introductory examination of the solar system, stellar systems, and stellar and galactic evolution according to currently accepted concepts. Introduces astronomical instruments and light theory. (Formerly AST 101, Introductory Astronomy) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

Aviation (AV)
  
AV 110 Private Pilot Ground School (3-6)
Course provides those interested in the basics of flying with the information needed to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Private Pilot Knowledge (or ""written"") Test. Repeatable up to six credits. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Biology (BIOL)
  
BIOL 100 General Biology for Non Majors (3)
Basic biological concepts, interpretation and application of scientific methods, and effects of biological advances on society. Core curriculum science course; cannot be used for credit toward field of concentration in biology. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

BIOL 124 Northeastern Nevada Plants (2)
Study of plant identification, structure, floral adaptations, and plant ecology of native plants in northeastern Nevada.

BIOL 190 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
Structure and function of cells. Major molecules of life; composition and physiology of cellular organelles; cell metabolism, reproduction, motility, and gene function of both plant and animal cells. Required for biology majors. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96, MATH 97, MATH 120 or higher, or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

BIOL 191 Introduction to Organismal Biology (4)
The study of the evolution, ecology, and diversity of life, both past and present. Required for biology majors, but will partially satisfy the science requirement for all associate's degrees. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190.

BIOL 223 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
The morphology and physiology of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems in a laboratory and lecture class. Designed for all life science majors but specifically for students in allied health programs. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be taking BIOL 190.

BIOL 224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
A continuation of Biology 223 with consideration of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems; increased emphasis on body chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 223.

BIOL 251 General Microbiology (4)
A laboratory and lecture course emphasizing taxonomy, morphology, physiology, infectious diseases, and ecology of microorganisms in addition to skills in aseptic procedures, isolation, and identification. Open to all life science majors and allied health majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190.

BIOL 299 Special Topics in Biology (1-4)
Topics of interest emphasizing the natural history of the Great Basin including winter bird watching, hawk watching in the Goshutes, small mammal ecology, and the flowers of the Ruby Mountains. Includes field trips.

BIOL 300 Principles of Genetics (4)
Study of the basic principles of transmission of traits from one generation to the next. Topics include Mendelian, population, and molecular genetics with an emphasis on gene regulation. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems will be described. Three hours of lecture with three hours of laboratory. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and CHEM 122 and STAT 152 and be sophomore or higher standing.

BIOL 305 Introduction to Conservation Biology (3)
Fundamental topics in conservation biology including biodiversity, invasive and endangered species, reserve design, and environmental legislation. Lecture only. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191.

BIOL 320 Invertebrate Zoology (4)
The study of animals that lack a dorsal nerve cord (backbone). This course explores the origin, evolution, taxonomy, physiology, and morphology of invertebrate members of the kingdom of Animalia. The laboratory component of this course emphasizes the similarities and differences of animal phyla and requires examination and dissection of preserved specimens. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and be sophomore standing or higher.

BIOL 331 Plant Taxonomy (3)
The study of vascular plant identification, naming, and classification, within an evolutionary context. Evolutionary processes and the history of systematics will be discussed. Laboratory experiences will emphasize angiosperm family characteristics, the collection and preservation of plant specimens, and the identification of the northeastern Nevada flora. The course will require two hours of lecture with three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191.

BIOL 341 Principles of Ecology (3)
The fundamentals of ecology studied at the levels of population, community, and ecosystems. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and STAT 152.

BIOL 400 Field School in Biology (4)
This course is designed to provide students with field experience in biology. Students will study relationships between abiotic factors, plant communities, and the animals that utilize them. Field techniques will be emphasized. This course will meet for extended periods in the field requiring adequate preparation on the part of the student. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and STAT 152 and have sophomore standing or higher.

BIOL 410 Plant Physiology (3)
A survey of the basic physiologic processes of plants. Topics include photosynthesis, metabolism, nutrition, growth and development, as well as effect of environment on these processes. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and CHEM 122 and be sophomore standing.

BIOL 434 Mammalogy (4)
The study of mammals. This course explores the origin, evolution, taxonomy, morphology, physiology, biogeography, behavior, and ecology of mammals. Laboratory will stress identification and natural history of mammals native to Nevada. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and be sophomore standing or higher.

BIOL 447 Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology (3)
Comparative physiology provides a detailed understanding of the diverse array of physiological systems evolved to allow animals to function in various environments. The comparative approach is used to understand physiological adaptations to various environments and the evolution of physiological systems. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Student must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and CHEM 122.

BIOL 496 Advanced Topics in Modern Biology (1-3)
Advanced study in a specialized area of biology. Topics are selected and published in the class schedule. May be repeated up to six credits. (Formerly BIOL 496, Special Topics) Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191. Instructor permission required.

Business (BUS)
  
BUS 101 Introduction to Business (3)
A one-semester survey course covering business organization, operation, and management, designed to orient the student to the field of business.

BUS 102 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
Course serves as the foundation for the GBC Associate of Applied Science--Entrepreneurship Emphasis degree program. Introduces techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's entrepreneurs using practical examples. Formerly BUS 102, Entrepreneurship I) (Formerly, BUS 102, Introduction to Entrepreneurship) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 110 Human Relations for Employment (1-3)
Introduces students to the principles and skills of effective communication in business and professional settings. It provides information on how to communicate with superiors, co-workers, subordinates, clients, and customers. Three-credit course includes a computation component. Repeatable up to a total of three credits. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 117 Business Calculations and Methods (3)
Fundamental arithmetic processes applied to business activities and applications. Including discounts, markups, payroll, interest, annuities, present value of money, depreciation, tax computations, business statistics, and general application of mathematics for planning and problem solving using algebraic equations/graphics and other basic forecasting techniques. (Formerly BUS 117, Applied Business Mathematics) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 198 Special Topics in Business (1-3)
Selected business topics offered for general interest and the business community. Not a required course. May be repeated for credit if topics are different. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 201 Entrepreneurship II (3)
Extends techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's aspiring entrepreneurs using practical examples. The major project for the course is the preparation of a useful business plan, instructions on acquiring financing, and explanations of other business startup activities, especially, setting up marketing programs and strategic/tactical plans. Recommended prerequisite: BUS 102 or MGT 103.

BUS 273 Business Law I (3)
A study of the origin, philosophy, and nature of law and procedures including court systems, contracts, agency, partnerships, sales, criminal law, and torts.

BUS 274 Business Law II (3)
A continuation of BUS 273. Includes a study of corporation law, property, secured transactions, negotiable instruments, insurance, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: Must have completed BUS 273.

BUS 275 Foundations of International Business (3)
Introduces students to the impact of geography, the Internet, and different environments in which international business is conducted and the uncontrollable forces at work in all business environments. Topics discussed will include the importance of international organizations, the international monetary system, and the relevance of certain aspects of international business to managers and business people.

Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD)
  
CADD 100 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting (1-4)
Introduction to the basic capabilities of a computer-aided drafting (CAD) system. Includes appropriate hardware, software, and applicable commands.

CADD 105 Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting (1-4)
A course in 2D and 3D drafting covers the intermediate features of computer-aided drafting and design including layers, attributes, and 3D. (Formerly CADD 105, Intermediate Computer-Aided 2D and 3D Drafting) Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 100.

CADD 121 CAD for Land Surveyors (3)
The use of computer-aided drafting (CAD) software to create survey plats and topographic maps. The first ten weeks of instruction will focus on learning basic CAD commands. The remaining five weeks will focus on the production of typical survey plats and topographic maps.

CADD 200 Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting (1-4)
Course continues development of three-dimensional construction, modification, and rendering. New features explored through exercises to embed URLs and use drawing web format. The SQL database environment is introduced. Customize environments by changing variables in Preferences, make new toolbar buttons and toolbars. Other advanced features introduced include menu structure, AutoLISP, and OLE. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 105.

CADD 210 CADD Project (1-4)
Special project application offering instruction and practical experience applying CADD principle to industry. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 105. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CADD 230 Civil Drafting I (1-4)
Covers the use of AutoDesk Civil 3D software for producing working civil engineering drawings. Focuses on drawings developed based on ""existing conditions"" from survey data that are suitable for designing civil engineering improvements and will move into developing of a civil engineering layout plans. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 105. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CADD 255 CADD Customization I (3)
A basic course in customizing AutoCAD software. By using lecture as well as hands-on exercises, students will learn how to make AutoCAD more efficient and productive. A large part of the course will focus on programming in AutoLISP, the customization language for AutoDesk products. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 105 and CIT 129.

CADD 290 Internship in Drafting (1-4)
A work-based learning experience in computer aided drafting and design at various places of employment utilizing CADD in the GBC service area. Students will be mentored by professional people in the businesses partnering with GBC to provide these work place learning experiences. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CADD 299 Capstone/Assessment (3)
An individualized project to apply the skills taught in the CADD/GIS emphasis area. The intent is for the student to assimilate and integrate the content of the program. A final professional presentation is created that can serve as an assessment portfolio for employers and the college. (Formerly CADD 299, CADD/GIS Capstone Project) Prerequisite: Must have sophomore standing or higher.

CADD 345 Technical Graphics Communication (3)
This course for technology managers teaches the principles and importance of visual presentation for communicating detailed, comprehensive, and accurate information about designs and processes. Basic drafting and CADD techniques necessary for modeling and visualizing graphic objects. Published standards and conventions when managing people and resources during the design process. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 100.

Counseling and Personal Services (CAPS)
  
CAPS 124 Developing Your Potential (1-3)
Development of potential through self-exploration and goal setting. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Chemistry (CHEM)
  
CHEM 100 Molecules and Life in the Modern World (3)
Introduction to chemistry in its many forms and applications, physical and organic, with consideration of environmental and social issues. Includes laboratory activities. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

CHEM 121 General Chemistry I (4)
Fundamentals of chemistry including reaction stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, states of matter, and thermochemistry. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or higher.

CHEM 122 General Chemistry II (4)
Fundamentals of chemistry including solutions, kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and properties of inorganic and organic compounds. Also, introduction to qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 121.

CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I (3)
Intensive introduction to the theory of carbon chemistry with particular emphasis on understanding the relationship between the structure and behavior of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 122 and be taking CHEM 241L.

CHEM 241L Organic Chemistry for life Sciences Lab I (1)
Laboratory exercises in introductory organic chemistry. Stereochemistry, separation and purification techniques, micro-scale organic reaction procedures. Prerequisite: Must be taking CHEM 241.

CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II (3)
Continuation of CHEM 241 with emphasis on complex reactions and mechanisms, and introduction to advanced approaches for the synthesis of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 241 and be taking CHEM 242L.

CHEM 242L Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences Lab II (1)
Laboratory exercises in intermediate organic chemistry with continued emphasis on micro-scale organic reaction procedures. Introduction to the identification of organic compounds using chemical and instrumental means (qualitative analysis). Prerequisite: Must be taking CHEM 242.

CHEM 292 Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-3)
Independent study of a special problem, research and/or assigned reading in chemistry. May be repeated up to six credits.

CHEM 392 Special Topics in Chemistry (1-3)
Laboratory or lecture course in area not covered in other courses. May be repeated up to six credits.

CHEM 492 Advanced Topics in Chemistry (1-2)
Selected topics from the various disciplines of chemistry not covered by any other course offerings and of current interest to students and faculty. May be repeated up to four credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 242.

Computer and Information Technology (CIT)
  
CIT 110 A+ Hardware (3)
Techniques of personal computer hardware maintenance and installation. Course covers hardware and software diagnostics, system troubleshooting, and methods of achieving effective system upgrades to enhance capabilities or improve system performance.

CIT 112 Network + (3)
Course covers computer network infrastructure, network uses, and basic network management issues. CIT 112 has no prerequisite but assumes that students are familiar with computer hardware, have a basic understanding of stand alone operating systems, and can use applications software. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 151 Beginning Web Development (3)
Create and maintain web pages using HTML. Build interactive web pages using dynamic HTML. Topics include images, tables, frames, CSS styles, forms, FTP, and site maintenance. Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201.

CIT 173 Linux Installation and Configuration (3)
Course covers Linux installation, configuration, and workstation operating system concepts.

CIT 174 Linux System Administration (3)
Covers concepts required for Linux server system administration and common networking services configuration, operation, and management. There is no formal prerequisite, however, CIT 173 or a basic understanding of either the UNIX or Linux workstation environment is recommended.

CIT 180 Database Concepts and SQL (3)
This class is targeted for people with little or no SQL knowledge. The objective of this class is to familiarize students with database concepts that will be needed by programmers as well as professionals maintaining data management systems in such as those used in GIS. The class is accented with hands-on learning in Structured Query Language (SQL) and SQL procedures. Prerequisite: Must have completed CS 135.

CIT 198 Special Topics in Computer Info Technology (1)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects in computer and information technology. The course will be variable credit depending on the class content and number of hours required to cover that content. No prerequisites, but various skills may be recommended depending on class content, see syllabus for any such recommendations. [S/U]

CIT 201 Word Certification Preparation (3)
A hands-on course building on the foundation laid in COT 151 and continuing on to sophisticated manipulation of word processing software. Topics include tables, graphic boxes, clip art, desktop publishing, fonts, macros, styles, and spreadsheets. Recommend: COT 151. (Formerly CIT 201, Word Certification Preparation) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 202 Excel Certification Preparation (3)
In-depth exploration of Excel spreadsheets. Topics include advanced functions, importing and exporting data, multiple tables and workbooks, pivot tables, macros, and VBA. Team and student projects are conducted. (Formerly CIT 202, Excel Certification Preparation) Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 203 Access Certification Preparation (3)
In-depth exploration of Access database management. Topics include tables, relationships, queries, forms, and reports. Macros, VBA modules, and web pages are created. Team and student projects are conducted in building and maintaining a database. Access 2007 required.(Formerly CIT 203, Access Certification Preparation) Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 211 Microsoft Networking I (3-5)
Course covers MS Windows workstation/client operating systems concepts in both a network and stand alone environment. (Formerly CIT 211, MCSE I)

CIT 212 Microsoft Networking II (3-5)
Introduces students to computer network server administration and management using MSMCSE II. CIT 211 or an advanced understanding of a Windows desktop environment is recommended.

CIT 213 Microsoft Networking III (3-5)
Teaches strategies and tactics for implementing, administering, and troubleshooting information systems that incorporate Windows NT Server or Windows 2000 Server in an enterprise computing environment. (Formerly CIT 213, MCSE III) Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 214 Microsoft Networking IV (3-5)
Course covers computer network directory services using Microsoft's Active Directory Services. (Formerly CIT 214, MCSE IV) Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 215 Microsoft Networking V (3-5)
Various topics in networking using Microsoft products aimed at the less common MCSE electives. Unlimited repeatability. (Formerly CIT 215, MCSE Elective) Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 217 Security + (3)
Prepares professionals with some networking experience and who possess a thorough knowledge of TCP/IP to take and pass the CompTIA Security + certification exam. Topics will include general security basics of cryptography and operational/ organizational security. Working knowledge and network servers or associated certifications would be considered essential.

CIT 252 Web Database Development (3)
Interactive web pages will be built to accomplish store front applications. Storefront software will be used to produce shopping cart applications with product display, shopping cart, check out, and confirmation web pages along with several databases. Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201 or CIT 151 or CIT 129 or CIT 203 or GRC 188.

CIT 261 VBA Programming for Microsoft Office (3)
Visual Basic for applications involves programming inside Microsoft Office, Word, Excel, and Access. This is the most common type of programming in today's work world and creates more interactivity in the office software. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 129 or CIT 202 or CIT 203.

CIT 264 Operating System Security (3)
Covers a full range of security concepts, techniques, and applications as required by server operating systems and networks. This will include VPNs, authentication, encryption, and patching. It will culminate in discussions of monitoring, auditing, and disaster recovery. Recommended prerequisite: CIT 212 or CIT 173. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 301 Network Management Essentials (1)
Designed for non-graphic majors. Covers essential concepts in graphic communications required for a manager of digital technology systems. Students will start work on individual portfolios of their achievements during this degree program. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree.

CIT 303 Intermediate Survey of Computing (3)
This course surveys essential concepts in a wide range of computing fields including database management, GIS, graphic communications, networking, and programming required by managers of computing systems and departments. This class assumes students understand at least one area of computing well then builds on that understanding to provide them with a survey of additional computing technologies that IT managers could reasonably be expected to facilitate and supervise. Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree and either COT 204 or CIT 211.

CIT 361 Tcp/Ip:Managing Network Resources (3)
Course provides in-depth coverage of TCP/IP concepts, protocols, and programming including IPv6. Prerequisite: Must have completed (CIT 112 or CIT 301 or CIT 303) and MATH 116 or higher.

CIT 454 E Commerce (3)
eCommerce concepts and topics will be examined. Working eCommerce sites will be developed on the Internet. Prerequisite: Must have declared AAS - Web Specialist Emphasis or have completed COT 301 or CIT 303.

Comprehensive Medical Imaging (CMI)
  
CMI 376 Sectional Anatomy in Medical Imaging (3)
This online course will cover transverse, coronal, and sagittal anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. Areas of discussion include skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, nervous. lymphatic, and visceral anatomic relationships. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 223.

Communications (COM)
  
COM 101 Oral Communication (3)
Introduction to the fundamentals of effective speaking. Develops the vocal and intellectual skills required for effective and powerful speaking in conversation and before an audience. (Formerly THTR 113, Fundamentals of Speech I) (Formerly COM 113, Fundamentals of Speech Communications)

COM 159 Writing for Radio and Television (3)
An introduction to basic script formats, terminology, style, and writing techniques for radio, television, and other electronic media. Topics include commercials, promotions, public relations, instruction/training, corporate video, and teleplays. Develops the ability to write aurally as well as visually.

COM 196 Internship (3)
A work-based learning experience in television production and television news at the campus-based NBC affiliate, KENV-TV. Students will be mentored by professional staff members and assist in the production of news broadcasts, commercials, and public service announcements. Must contact instructor before registering. Prerequisite: Must have completed JOUR 201.

Computer Office Technology (COT)
  
COT 60 Computer Basics (0.5)
Designed for those who have very little (or no) computer experience. A gentle introduction to computers, the instructor will inspire confidence, and encourage further computer use. Learn how to work with several different programs within the Windows environment. [S/U]

COT 61 Introduction to Windows (0.5-1)
A course for those with no previous computer knowledge, focusing on basic Windows skills. [S/U]

COT 62 Introduction to Word (0.5-1)
A beginning course for those with no previous word processing knowledge and an introduction to Microsoft Word. [S/U]

COT 63 Introduction to Excel (0.5-1)
A beginning course for those with no previous spreadsheet knowledge and an introduction to Microsoft Excel. [S/U]

COT 64 Introduction to Powerpoint (0.5-1)
A beginning course for those with no previous presentation knowledge using Microsoft PowerPoint 2002. [S/U]

COT 101 Computer Keyboarding I (3)
Learn the keyboard by touch using computers. Course covers alphabet keys, number keys, and symbol keys. Emphasis on keyboarding techniques, speed, and accuracy.

COT 151 Introduction to Microsoft Word (3)
An introduction to Microsoft Word, a word processing software, ruler, toolbars, dialog boxes, cut, copy, and paste, autocorrect, spell check, template documents, columns, outlines, merge, clip art, graphics, text art, and tables. Recommended: COT 101 or 30 words per minute keyboarding skill.

COT 198 Special Topics in Computer Office Technology (1-6)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects. The class will be variable credit of one to six depending on the class content and number of hours required. No prerequisite, but various skills recommended, depending on class content. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

COT 204 Using Windows (3)
The fundamentals necessary to operate the Windows system, how to customize the Windows environment, and how to use the various accessories. (Formerly, COT 204, Introduction to Windows)

COT 240 Executive Office Procedures (3)
Introduces skills and knowledge to meet the challenges of the electronic office. Topics include public relations, written and oral communications, telephone techniques, travel and conference arrangements, records management, meeting planning, and job-seeking/selection.

COT 241 Medical Office Procedures (3)
Introduces medical office administrative procedures. Topics include appointment processing, written and oral communications, ethics, confidentiality, HIPAA, medical records, patient orientation and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic administrative skills within the medical environment. Emphasis on developing human relations and customer service skills.

COT 290 Internship in Computer Technology (1-6)
A course designed wherein students will apply knowledge and skills to real on-the-job situations in a program designed by a company official and a faculty advisor to maximize learning experiences. Available to students who have completed most Core and Major requirements and have A 2.5 G.P.A. Contact the instructor for the application, screening, and required skills evaluation. Up to six semester hour credits may be earned on the basis of 75 hours of internship for one credit. This course may be repeated for up to six credits Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

COT 301 Database Management Essentials (1)
A working overview of Access database. The main emphasis will be on analyzing previously established data, using table searches, queries, and reports. Excel will be used for further data analysis. A discussion of table design will be included. Students will start work on individual portfolios of their achievements during this degree program. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree.

COT 490 Digital Communications (3)
A capstone seminar covering the common theme of data communications among the BAS in Digital Information Technology courses. Relationships between data organization, digital multimedia, data presentation, data security, and data communications will be covered. Students will finalize the digital portfolio of their accomplishments while completing this degree program. Prerequisite: Must have senior standing.

Counseling and Personal Development (CPD)
  
CPD 116 Substance Abuse - Fundamental Facts and Insights (3)
An introduction to various issues relating to alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in society. Students will gain knowledge of the physical effects of various drugs of abuse. Sociological, cultural, family impact, and prevention issues will be addressed. No prerequisite.

Criminal Justice (CRJ)
  
CRJ 104 Introduction to Administration of Justice (3)
American criminal justice system, its development, components, and processes. Includes consideration of crime and criminal justice as a formal area of study.

CRJ 105 Corrections Operations and Jail Management (3)
Investigations will be made into the court structures, constructive and punishment-oriented correctional institution programs, and the present day correctional officers roles. Jail and prison life and adjustment will be discussed along with ways in which the correctional institution climate can be enhanced. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 106 Introduction to Corrections (3)
History and development of corrections. Current practices and problems of the correctional system. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 110 Introduction to Nevada Law Enforcement (3)
This course provides a systematic approach to examination of criminal justice in the State of Nevada. It will also include an overview of the major subsystems: police, prosecution, defense, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Designed for students who will be attending the Law Enforcement Training Academy. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 112 Criminal Justice Organization and Administration (3)
Theory of management and motivation, bureaucracy, labor laws and relations, financial administration, and criminal justice agency administration. An in-depth study of the goals, policies, and functions of the criminal justice agency. Recommend: CRJ 104

CRJ 114 Firearms II (2)
Course includes advanced range qualification, precision marksmanship, defensive measures, counter ambush procedures, combat shooting, robbery in progress, building searches, and shotgun use. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 120 Community Relations (3)
Analyzes the reasons and techniques for developing communication and understanding between the criminal justice system and various segments of the community. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 140 Elements of Supervision (3)
An introduction to supervisory roles in criminal justice agencies, selection process for supervisors, models for decision making, and leadership styles. Addresses current trends in contemporary supervision within the criminal justice field. Covers the rights, obligations, and duties of line supervisors. Assesses the first-line supervisor's role within the law enforcement agency. Instructor permission required.

CRJ 155 Juvenile Justice System (3)
Study of the philosophy and function of the juvenile court including court procedures and law, theories of causation and intervention strategies for juvenile offenders. Includes police encounters with juveniles, the juvenile court process, juvenile dispositions, and after care. Discussions include dependent and neglected youth in the system, the death penalty for juveniles, and school crimes. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 164 Introduction to Criminal Investigation (3)
Fundamentals of investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and presentation of physical evidence, scientific aids, sources of information, case preparation, interviews and interrogations, and follow-up. Recommend: CRJ 104. (Formerly CRJ 164, Principles of Investigation)

CRJ 170 Physical Training for Law Enforcement (1)
P.O.S.T. pretest. Physical training relevant to a law enforcement profession to prepare for the final physical training test. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 180 Introduction to Security (3)
History and development of security services function, interrelationship to the legal process, career roles, and operational processes in various types of security organizations. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 201 Women in the Criminal Justice System (3)
Overall view of both sides and the roles in which women participate in the Criminal Justice System. The main concentration of the course will be in the following areas: theories of female criminality, extent of female crime, women as victims, women as offenders, women as defendants and prisoners, and women as practitioners and professionals, i.e., police, courts, and corrections. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 211 Police in America (3)
Course includes policy history and organization, the personal side of policing, police operations, critical issues in policing, specific police problems, women and minorities in policing, and becoming a police officer. Designed to help students develop their own philosophy of law enforcement. Critical thinking and discussion of ideas and opinions essential. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 214 Principles of Police Patrol Techniques (3)
Identification of community problems which require prevention, suppression, or control through the basic methods and techniques of police patrol. The responsibilities of officers in patrol situations including foot beats, one-man cars and/or tactical units, techniques of observation and perception, recognition of hazards, evaluation, and proper police patrol action. Recommend: CRJ 104. (Formerly CRJ 214, Principles of Police Patrol)

CRJ 215 Probation and Parole (3)
Survey of the probation and parole systems of the United States including different systems within the United States; executive clemency; parole; rights of prisoners, probationers, and parolees; treatment strategies; and administrative aspects. Includes correctional and professional aspects of the parole and probation officers: the role, preparation of a probation summary, a day in court with a probation officer, and time with a parole officer. Recommend: CRJ 104. (Formerly CRJ 215, Probation and Parole I)

CRJ 219 Emergency Vehicle Operation and Control (3)
Shuffle steering, steering motion dynamics, and vehicle braking (lock-wheel, ABS, impending). Pursuit driving times (vehicle timing) and techniques. Measurement of hearing and tunnel vision. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 220 Criminal Procedures (3)
Origin, development, and rationale of the structural and procedural aspects of America's criminal justice system. Emphasis on arrest, search and seizure, confessions, and related legal issues. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 226 Prevention and Control of Delinquency (3)
An introduction to major types of delinquent behavior, psychology of the delinquent, and factors contributing to the production of criminality or delinquency. Discussion of methods used by the criminal justice system to control delinquent behavior. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 230 Criminal Law (3)
Substantive criminal law including elements of crime, intent, attempts, search and seizure, and the laws of arrest. Relation of criminal law to working police officer and rights and duties of both citizen and officer under criminal law. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 232 Principles of Correctional Administration (3)
Principles of staff operation within the correction process; administration setting, budgeting and financial control, recruitment and development of staff, public relations, and decision making; information concerning the offender, why they classify in a certain manner, and varied strategies available. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 233 Nevada Criminal Law (3)
Familiarizes the CRJ student with Nevada Criminal Law as set forth in the Nevada Revised Statutes and as interpreted and tested in cases before the Nevada Courts. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 265 Introduction to Physical Evidence (3)
Surveys the forensic sciences to show their role in the use of physical evidence in matters of criminal and/or civil law. Focus on the value of modern scientific investigation. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 270 Introduction to Criminology (3)
Examines how society interacts with crime and delinquency through the use of the criminal justice system. Studies effective interaction and communication between the general public and members of the criminal justice system. Emphasizes the understanding of criminal behavior from a sociological and psychological perspective. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104.

CRJ 285 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (1-6)
Consideration of special topics and issues in criminal justice. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. Unlimited repeatability. (Formerly CRJ 198B, Special Topics in Criminal Justice) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Computer Science (CS)
  
CS 135 Computer Science I (3)
This course is an introduction to modern problem solving and programming methods. Emphasis is placed on algorithm development. A special focus will be on procedural and data abstraction, emphasizing design, testing, and documentation. Prerequisite: Must be taking or have completed MATH 126 or higher.

Dance (DAN)
  
DAN 188 Choreography I: Improvization for Composition (2)
An introduction to the creative process of dance making using improvisation. Unlimited repeatability. [F]

Drafting and Design (DFT)
  
DFT 100 Basic Drafting Principles (1-4)
An introduction to manual drafting procedures including lettering; geometric constructions; orthographic projection; dimensioning sections; auxiliary views; and metric, architectural, and engineering techniques.

Diesel Technology (DT)
  
DT 100 Shop Practices (0.5-4)
An introduction to hand tool identification and proper use, shop safety, and other topics including screw thread, hydraulic hose, and fitting identification. Also covers measuring devices. Also available as TA 100. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 101 Basic Diesel Engines (1-4)
A review of basic engine operation with an emphasis on operating principles, nomenclature, components, and design, and terminology. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 102 Basic Vehicle Electronics (1-9)
A lecture and laboratory course study of AC and DC electricity as used in mobile equipment. Emphasis on charging systems, starting systems, lighting systems, and wiring diagrams. Troubleshooting and repairing of electrical components, electronic controls systems, and voltage drops analysis will be covered. May be taught in modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 105 Mobile Air Conditioning (1-5)
A lecture and laboratory course covering heating and refrigeration theory. Includes heating and air conditioning components, control systems, service evacuation, charging, overhaul, and replacement of major components. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 106 Heavy Duty Transmissions and Power Trains (1-6)
The theory and operation of heavy equipment power trains will be covered in detail with emphasis on power shift transmissions. Students will become familiar with driveline angle calculations, gear ratios, clutches, differentials, and transmission electronic control systems. Course may be repeated up to two times. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 113 Hydraulics I (3)
Introduces basic hydraulic systems through component recognition, circuit reading, and practical application focused on hazard recognition. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 114 Hydraulics II (3)
Explains the function, operation, and application of components in a hydraulic system. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 115 Hydraulics III (1.5)
Explains the testing and troubleshooting of hydraulic system components using leak path analysis. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 116 Hydraulics IV (1.5)
Hydraulics IV will explain the testing and troubleshooting of the components in a hydraulic system in circuit using leak path analysis. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 118 Electrics I (3)
An introductory course. The first in a series of courses to study electricity as related to mobile heavy equipment. Basic DC and AC electricity is covered in theory and reinforced with laboratory experiments. Ohm's Law, magnetism, and electrical component and system identification are covered. Electrical safety and hazard recognition are emphasized. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 119 Electrics II (3)
The second in a series of electrical courses emphasizing mobile heavy equipment electrical systems. Electrical component disassembly, testing, and maintenance are covered. Lighting, relays, circuit breakers, wiring diagrams, and battery testing are discussed and reinforced through laboratory work. Electrical safety and hazard recognition are also covered. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 201 Diesel Brakes and Pneumatics (2.5)
The principles of pneumatic brake systems are discussed in detail, with emphasis on cam-operated brakes. Pneumatic brake valves, schematic drawings, and foundation brake troubleshooting will be included in this technical course. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 202 Diesel Fuel Systems and Troubleshooting (1-6)
The theory and operation of diesel fuel injection systems will include Cummins PT, Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, and Robert Bosch fuel systems. Governor operation and fuel system troubleshooting will be discussed. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 203 Diesel Shop Management (1.5)
Designed to give students experience in the management of an equipment repair shop. Each student is required to estimate repair orders, calculate taxes, and deal with customers and employees. The course objectively evaluates what is needed to operate an equipment repair business. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 210 Advanced Diesel Engines (1-9)
Students will learn engine troubleshooting through diagnostic tools. Course emphasis is on engine operation, diagnosis, and failure analysis. Course may be taught in modules with categories in, but not limited, to the following areas: fuel, cooling, lubrication, electrical, electronics, and failure analysis. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and DT 101 and DT 102 and DT 215. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 215 Electronic Diesel Engines (1-9)
Designed to give individuals knowledge of electronic diesel engine controls as they apply to major diesel engine manufacturers. Emphasis is placed on engine sensors, electronic injection systems, and engine operating systems. No prerequisite but students having experience with diesel engines and basic electronics will find it helpful. Course may be taught in modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and DT 101 and DT 102. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 299 Special Topics in Diesel Mechanics (1-10)
A special topics course in Diesel Technology to serve a variety of needs. Topics are determined by the course instructor.

Early Childhood Education (ECE)
  
ECE 121 Parent Caregiver Relationships (1)
A course designed for child development students in which they can acquire various communication skills to enhance parent/caregiver relationships. Covers interpersonal communication, listening skills, and cooperative problem solving. Newsletters, parent conferences, phone conversations, record keeping, and student data folders will be addressed.

ECE 123 Health and Nutrition for Young Children (1)
A study of young children concerning physical development, nutrition, health, safety, and childhood illnesses and diseases. Skills developed in selecting safe equipment, evaluating environments, and ensuring good health routines.

ECE 126 Social and Emotional Development for Infants and Toddlers (3)
Study of effective development in infancy and toddlerhood. Emphasis is placed on experiences and techniques or use in the home and child care setting which will foster self-concept and social interactions for children from birth to three years of age.

ECE 127 Role of Play for Infants and Toddlers (1-3)
Study of the role of play as it affects the social, emotional, and physical and intellectual growth and development of infants and toddlers.

ECE 130 Infancy (3)
Course studies social, emotional, language, and sensorimotor development in infancy. Emphasis is placed on facilitating optimum infant and toddler development.

ECE 151 Math in the Preschool Curriculum (1)
Activities and materials for developing mathematics readiness in the preschool.

ECE 152 Science in the Preschool Curriculum (1)
Activities and materials for teaching science in the preschool.

ECE 154 Literature for Preschool Children (1)
Survey of books for use with preschool children. Techniques of storytelling and reading to children. (Formerly ECE 154, Literature in the Preschool)

ECE 156 Music in the Preschool Curriculum (1)
Activities and materials for teaching music in the preschool. Songs, dances, and rhythm activities for use with preschool children.

ECE 157 Art in the Preschool Curriculum (1)
Activities and materials for teaching art in the preschool. Emphasis on developing creativity and enjoyment of art through a wide range of materials and activities.

ECE 158 Activities for Physical Development in Young Children (1)
Activities, materials, and equipment for developing gross motor coordination in preschool children including individual, small group, and large group activities for both indoor and outdoor use. (Formerly ECE 158, Physical Education in the Preschool Curriculum)

ECE 161 Social Studies and the Young Child (1)
Emphasizes activities and materials for teaching social studies in the preschool. Drawn from anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and psychology. (Formerly ECE 161, Social Studies in the Preschool Curriculum)

ECE 167 Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
Provides the opportunity for students to learn the legal definitions, symptoms, causes, and reporting procedures of child abuse and neglect. The class will include discussion of the roles and responsibilities of community agencies such as law enforcement, social services, child care personnel, medical and/or psychosocial professionals.

ECE 168 Infectious Diseases and First Aid in Child Care (1)
Provides information about infectious diseases and first-aid measures in child care settings. Course content will include recognizing communicable and acute illnesses, management of accidents and injuries, preventive measures, health education, current research, and community resources.

ECE 190 Professionalism in Early Care and Education (3)
Focuses on professional issues in Early Childhood Education including ethical guidelines and other professional guidelines and standards related to practice; professional organizations and activities; principles of effective leadership and advocacy for young children and for the profession; and relevant public policy at the local, state, and national levels.

ECE 198 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education (0.5-6)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects in Child Development. Class is variable in credit depending on class content and number of hours required. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ECE 200 The Exceptional Child (3)
The characteristics, training, and educational needs of disabled and gifted children. Explores the existing educational agencies, programs, and instructional methods designed for the disabled and the gifted. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250.

ECE 204 Principles of Child Guidance (3)
A study of effective communication with children in guiding behavior. Emphasis will be placed on techniques which help children build positive self-concepts and individual strengths within the context of appropriate limits and discipline. The study includes uses of direct and indirect guidance techniques as well as introduction to guidance systems.

ECE 231 Preschool Practicum: Early Childhood Lab (6)
Working in a preschool setting with young children under the supervision of a master teacher, planning and implementing activities. Practicum will normally be taken during the final year of the child development program. Law requires a TB test prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251 and ECE 262 and HDFS 232.

ECE 232 Practicum: Infant and Toddler (3-4)
The student works directly with infants or toddlers in a supervised facility. The student is responsible for the environment, activities, and routine of the children, and reports and evaluates the experiences with the practicum supervisor. Prerequisite: Must be a declared ECE infant/toddler major. Instructor permission required.

ECE 240 Administration of the Preschool (3)
Areas covered include organizational structure, budgeting, personnel policies and practices, records, statistics, reporting, relationship with community resources, licensing regulation, safety, nutrition, and health issues. (Formerly ECE 240, Principles and Practices of Preschool and Child Care Organization and Administration) Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 200 and ECE 204 and ECE 250 and ECE 251.

ECE 250 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)
Introduces students to early childhood education. Course deals with the total preschool program including types, objectives, philosophy, curriculum, physical plant, and equipment, as these aspects of the program relate to the needs and interests of the preschool child. (Formerly ECE 131, Introduction to Teaching the Young Child)

ECE 251 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (3)
This course will consist of methods of planning and teaching curriculum for children three to five years old. Included will be curriculum development, children's play, lesson planning, and daily scheduling. Emphasis on art, science, literature, music, language, blocks, dramatic play, etc. (Formerly ECE 151, Preschool Curriculum) Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250.

ECE 252 Infant/Toddler Curriculum (3)
Students will learn a variety of theories and apply them to the design of curriculum appropriate for infants and toddlers up to three years old, taking into account stages of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language development. Students will learn and utilize best practice in the curriculum planning to include routines, individualized curriculum, and care giving relationships.

ECE 262 Early Language and Literacy Development (3)
Course focuses on the four areas of Language Arts: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Through a hands-on and interactive approach, students will explore the process of combining quality practices with specific materials and strategies focused on language and literacy development. In addition, students will examine the fundamentals of oral language and literacy-rich environments supported by the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are predictive of later success in learning to read and write. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251.

ECE 480 Preschool Supervised Teaching Internship (1-12)
Student interns will work in a preschool setting with young children under the supervision of a master teacher while practicing and applying the methodologies gained throughout their Early Childhood coursework. Students will write comprehensive lesson plans based on a literacy project approach support by the Nevada Preschool Standards. These plans will be implemented as each student gradually assumes the role of lead teacher. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251 and ECE 262 and HDFS 232.

Economics (ECON)
  
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
Study of the causes and effects of individuals' choices among alternative uses of scarce resources. Topics include supply and demand analysis, price determination, theories of various market structures, competition and coordination, labor, the role of profit and interest, and government involvement in the economy.

ECON 103 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
Basic price and quantity relationships, study of monetary systems and policy, inflation, production and growth, recession, unemployment, fiscal policy, supply and demand perspectives, international exchange, and governmental-market relationships. Formerly ECON 101.

ECON 104 Current Economic Issues (3)
Analysis of current economic issues and their relevance to individuals in their roles as consumers, workers, businessmen, and voters. Economic theories and concepts are utilized in explaining important social interaction relating to such topics as medical care, anti-trust policy, price controls, drug prohibition, environmentalism, tax policy, public debt, and income distribution. (Formerly ECON 104, Economics Issues)

ECON 295 Special Topics in Economics (1-3)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of topics. This course will be variable credit of one-to-three credits depending on the course content and number of hours required. The course may be repeated for up to six credits.

ECON 307 Environmental Economics (3)
An application of the principles of marginal analysis and economic reasoning to the environment. Differing perspectives on issues relating to ownership, property rights, preservation incentives under different scenarios, the Coase theorem, trade-offs among human values, distributional effects of varying uses of scarce resources, and differing public policy issues. Formerly ECON 307, Economics of the Environment) Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

ECON 311 Professional Ethics (3)
A study of the nature of ethical thinking and its application to judgments about actions of people that make up society. Topics to be considered include ethical relativism, moral virtues and vices, foundations of morality, alternative theoretical perspectives on moral judgment, egoism, altruism, and legal and regulatory perspectives related to ethics in business. Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

ECON 365 Labor Economics (3)
An application of economic theory relating to labor issues. Topics include determination of wage and employment levels, worker cartels, fringe benefits, subsistence wages, minimum wage laws, living wage laws, unemployment compensation, fairness in wage distribution, the division of labor, and tenure systems. Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

Education Career and Technical (EDCT)
  
EDCT 439 General Methods of Teaching Career and Technical Education (3)
Designed for direct involvement in solving teaching and learning problems in career and technology education and occupational-vocational education. Emphasis is placed upon developing appropriate strategies for managing the classroom and occupational/industrial laboratory environment. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program or Business/Industry Endorsement. Corequisite: EDSC 315 or Business/Industry Endorsement.

EDCT 447 Curriculum Development in Career and Technical Education (3)
Course will provide students the opportunity to research and develop curriculum dealing with content and procedures for career and technical education programs.

EDCT 463 Teaching Secondary Business Education (3)
Designed for students who intend to pursue a career in teaching business subjects at the high school level. The major purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the curriculum materials and teaching strategies which are unique to teaching business subjects. Business education is explored through the development of curricular materials and instruction procedures, including assessment and evaluation procedures. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 315.

EDCT 471 Career and Technical Student Organizations (3)
Designed for students who intend to pursue a career teaching in the field of career and technical education at the middle/high school level. Familiarizes students with the benefits of student organizations and how to organize and manage a student organization in their particular field. Satisfies one of the requirements for the business and industry endorsement.

EDCT 490 Cooperative Career and Technical Programs (3)
Provides students with an understanding of the role, organization, and implementation of cooperative and applied or work-based vocational programs.

Education Elementary (EDEL)
  
EDEL 311 Elementary Methods Practicum I (1-3)
The first in a sequence of clinical and field experience courses. Students participate in field experiences and then reflect on what they have observed and learned. Students will spend approximately 15 hours observing in the public schools. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be taking EDU 250.

EDEL 313 Elementary Methods Practicum II (1-3)
The second in a sequence of clinical and field experiences. Students will spend approximately 25 hours observing in the public schools. The portfolio and admission process is explained. May be taken two different semesters. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be taking EDUC 323.

EDEL 315 Elementary Methods Practicum III (1-3)
The third in a sequence of clinical field experiences. Students will spend 30 to 60 hours observing and teaching in public schools. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL 433 or EDEL 443 or EDEL 453 or EDRL 437 or EDRL 442 or EDRL 443.

EDEL 331 Teaching Elementary School Art (3)
Art education in the elementary schools. Meets state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and MATH 120 and EDU 250.

EDEL 433 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics (3)
Course prepares prospective elementary teachers in the area of mathematics education. Students in this course will explore cognitive theories of development, methods, materials, and content of mathematics in the elementary grades. Curriculum changes that have taken place and current research in the area of mathematics education will be explored. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL315.

EDEL 443 Teaching Elementary School Science (3)
Course provides pre-service teachers with the theory, research, and best classroom practice related to science education. Students will be introduced to some of the materials, methods, and reasons for helping elementary children understand, perform, and appreciate science. Students will analyze the behavior of model teachers in elementary school classrooms and apply their acquired knowledge and skills by teaching elementary age students. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and have completed BIOL 190 and EDU 214 and be taking EDEL 315.

EDEL 453 Teaching Elementary School Social Studies (3)
Course focuses on integrating a number of subject areas into the curriculum. Explores the scope and sequences of understandings, attitudes, and skills taught in elementary social studies programs. Examines various methodologies used. A variety of teaching strategies will be explained and demonstrated for work with a diverse array of students in society. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL315.

EDEL 483 Elementary Supervised Teaching Internship (1-16)
A semester teaching experience approved by the Teacher Education Committee. Each student will have a placement for 16 weeks. Policies and procedures are detailed in the Student Teaching Handbook. (Formerly EDU 406, Student Teaching Internship) Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL 491. Instructor permission required.

EDEL 491 Elementary Education Capstone Seminar (1-3)
Addresses ethical, professional, and substantive issues in the teaching profession. This course forms the bridge between theory and practice where teaching skills can be analyzed, discussed, and refined: and professional competency can be assessed and achieved through professional collaboration and reflective practice. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teaching Internship program and be enrolled in EDEL 483 or EDSP 495. Instructor permission required.

Education Reading & Literature (EDRL)
  
EDRL 437 Teaching Reading (3)
A concentration on the developmental aspects of reading and language arts programs from kindergarten to eighth grade. Involves theoretical and research knowledge pertinent to child growth and development and also to fundamental skills appropriate for the teaching of reading and language arts, especially reading skills and phonetic skills. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL315.

EDRL 442 Literacy Instruction I (3)
Designed to help pre-service teachers view reading, writing, listening, and speaking from a holistic, integrated perspective. The course emphasizes content, teaching methods, and strategies specifically related to analyzing the language acquisition and development of children. The relationship between literacy, language arts, and other curricular areas will be explored. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL315.

EDRL 443 Literacy Instruction II (3)
Designed to help pre-service elementary teachers understand and apply current research and best practices in teaching reading, writing, listening, and speaking from a holistic, integrated perspective. The course emphasizes the relationship between literacy, language arts, and other curricular areas, as well as teaching methods and strategies specifically related to language arts. Content area reading, selection and use of appropriate materials, resources, and technologies will be addressed. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL315.

EDRL 471 Language Acquisition, Development and Learning (3)
Focuses on current acquisition theory and research and analysis of the implications of research for the classroom. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

EDRL 474 Methods for English Language Learners (3)
Provides systematic instruction to help ESL students (1) adjust to school; (2) acquire English for self-help and for extended interaction; (3) develop English for extended learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

EDRL 475 Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners (3)
Includes an analysis of standard second language tests and development and evaluation of teacher-generated instruments for placement, diagnosis, and teaching second language learners. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

EDRL 477 Curriculum Development for English Language Learners (3)
Involves an analysis of trends and issues in second language curricula and steps and procedures in the development of curricula. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

Education Secondary (EDSC)
  
EDSC 311 Secondary Methods Practicum I (1-3)
First in a sequence of field and clinical experience courses in a secondary classroom. Students work in middle-level or high school classrooms to develop skills working with students and implementing instructional plans. Students will spend approximately 15 hours observing in the public schools. Class may repeated up to a total of three credits. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be taking EDU 250.

EDSC 313 Secondary Methods Practicum II (1-3)
Second in a sequence of field and clinical experience courses in a secondary classroom. Students will observe approximately 25 hours of the middle-level or high school classrooms. The portfolio and admission process is explained. Class may be repeated up to a total of two credits. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be taking EDUC 323.

EDSC 315 Secondary Methods Practicum III (1-3)
The third and final course in a sequence of field and clinical experience courses. Students will spend 30-60 hours at the middle-level or high school classroom. Students will be expected to work toward completion of the requirements for their portfolio project. Taken in conjunction with content area methods course. Class may be repeated up to a total of three credits. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 473 or EDSC 463 or EDSC 453 or EDSC 433 or EDCT 463 or EDCT 439.

EDSC 407 Interdisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Secondary Education (3)
Examines the relationship between literacy skills and learning the context area. Students will focus on developing literacy skills to promote better learning in the content area as well as guide students to better interpret, analyze, evaluate, and communicate in the world around them. Ideas and literacy, mathematics, the process of reading and writing, and specific pedagogical strategies will be considered. The course will also include problem-solving approaches, planning curriculum, and analyzing techniques to evaluate a variety of content area resources. The course will ask students to analyze and reflect upon personal experience as a reader, a writer, and a problem solver. (Formerly EDU 440, Essential Skills Across the Curriculum) Prerequisite: Must have completed EDUC 323 and EDUC 406.

EDSC 433 Teaching Secondary English (3)
Designed to prepare students to teach English at the 7-12 grade levels. The course will consist of three hours of lecture and a one hour lab each week. Course objectives are aligned to the INTASC teaching standards. The course is premised upon the assumption that effective teachers combine an awareness of theory with ongoing research into effective practices, as well as continual reflection upon their own teaching. Students will also design objectives which reflect the Nevada State English standards and which integrate the various components of the Language Arts Curriculum. Students will develop and implement lessons and effective assessments based upon those objectives. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 315.

EDSC 453 Teaching Secondary Mathematics (3)
Course examines the methods, materials, teaching techniques, and strategies unique to mathematics education. Emphasis is placed on the pre-algebra, algebra, and geometry curriculum; classroom organization; test construction and evaluation; use of audio-visual materials and equipment. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 315.

EDSC 463 Teaching Secondary Science (3)
Course will give students a broad perspective on science education from its historical development to current issues and trends, and will introduce methods of curriculum design, assessment techniques, instructional strategies, and other areas important in equipping successful science teachers. Practical material will be developed that may be used as resources in future science teaching situations. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 315.

EDSC 473 Teaching Secondary Social Studies (3)
Designed to provide undergraduate students in secondary education with an overview of the methods, assessment techniques, materials, curriculum, and activities used to teach social studies. The course is intended to help students acquire a repertoire of planning and instructional skills necessary for teaching social studies. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be taking EDSC 315.

EDSC 483 Secondary Supervised Teaching Internship (1-16)
The Supervised Internship provides the student with the opportunity to experience, in depth, the full role and meaning of teaching in a school setting. Experiences include planning and organizing for instruction, developing classroom teaching competencies and skills, evaluating pupil progress, participating in extracurricular activities, working with special school personnel, and utilizing school and community resources in the instructional program. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teaching Internship program and be taking EDSC 491. Instructor permission required.

EDSC 491 Secondary Education Capstone Seminar (3)
Addresses ethical, professional, and substantive issues in the teaching profession. This course forms the bridge between theory and practice where teaching skills can be analyzed, discussed, and refined; and professional competency can be assessed and achieved through professional collaboration and reflective practice. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Internship program and be taking EDSC 483. Instructor permission required.

Special Education (EDSP)
  
EDSP 301 Education of the Exceptional Child (3)
A survey of the special education area for majors and non-majors, designed to acquaint the student with the special needs of learners categorized under all areas of exceptionality. Introduces methods for identifying, planning, and working effectively with exceptional children in the regular classroom. Emphasis on etiology, physical, and educational characteristics. The pre-service teacher is taught to recognize and refer exceptional learners for assessment, as well as design and implement individualized programs, instructional strategies, and classroom management strategies. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and EDU 250.

EDSP 434 Community and Family Integration for the Transition of Individuals with Special Needs (3)
The purpose of the course is to provide students with the understanding of theory, principles, procedures, and legal requirements for working toward collaborative partnerships among families, professionals, students, and other stakeholders to meet the transitional needs of the individual student with a disability. Also focuses on the importance of parent involvement with the individual student. Prerequisite: Must have taken EDSP 301.

EDSP 441 Characteristics and Inclusive Strategies for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities (3)
Provides an overview of educational laws/practices that influence the identification, placement, and instruction of students with mild to moderate disabilities. Instructional practices will include academic accommodations, social skills, and classroom management. Prerequisite: Must have taken EDSP 301.

EDSP 443 Special Education Curriculum: General Methods (3)
Special instructional methods for students with mild to moderate disorders. Includes instruction in IEP goals and objectives. Prerequisite: Must have completed EDSP 301 and be taking EDSP484.

EDSP 452 Assessment for Special Education Teachers (3)
Formal and informal methods of assessing students with disabilities: academic, language, motor, perception, and social skills. Interpretation of assessment and application to program needs. Prerequisite: Must have taken EDSP 301.

EDSP 453 Behavior Management Techniques for Students with Disabilities (3)
Course will present principles of applied behavior analysis that can be utilized to manage the behaviors of students with disabilities in the classroom and in other settings. The identification of target behaviors, data collections, selection of experimental designs, arranging of antecedents, arranging of consequences, and generalization of behavioral change will be presented. Prerequisite: Must have completed EDSP301 and be taking EDSP485.

EDSP 484 Special Education Practicum: Elementary Level (1)
Clinical and Field Experience in an elementary special education setting. Students will spend approximately 25 hours observing and in a special education setting in the public schools. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed EDSP 301 and be taking EDSP 443.

EDSP 485 Special Education Practicum: Secondary Level (1)
Clinical and Field Experience in a secondary special education setting. Students will spend approximately 25 hours observing and teaching in a special education setting in the public schools. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed EDSP 301 and be taking EDSP 453.

EDSP 495 Student Teaching Internship in Special Education (8-14)
Student Teaching Internship. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be taking EDEL 491. Instructor permission required.

Education (EDU)
  
EDU 120 School Law in Nevada (1)
Designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the legal aspects of the school setting in Nevada and examines historical development of paramount issues in contemporary education. Also emphasizes legal aspects of emerging educational patterns and meets state licensing requirements. [S/U]

EDU 210 Nevada School Law (2)
Historical development of paramount issues in contemporary education. Emphasizes legal aspects of emerging educational patterns. Meets state licensure requirements in Nevada School Law. [S/U]

EDU 214 Preparing Teachers to Use Technology (3)
Lab course on advanced skills and strategies for integrating technology into the K-12 classroom. Computer experience is required in word processing, basic spreadsheet design, and file management.

EDU 250 Foundations of Education (3)
A foundations course in education and introduction to the philosophy, history, and sociology of modern education. Emphasis is placed on current trends in education. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and be taking EDEL 311 or EDEL 313 or EDSC 311 or EDSC 313.

EDU 282 Strategies for Effective Substitute Teaching (1)
Specialized instruction designed to develop understanding of a current aspect of education. Maximum of three credits which may be applied as elective credit hours toward a degree. [S/U]

EDU 295 Education Topics: Subtitle Varies (1-6)
Special topics in education. Unlimited repeatability. [S/U]

Education (EDUC)
  
EDUC 323 Teaching and Learning Education (3)
Includes planning for learning-centered environments, preparing lesson plans, preparing a professional portfolio, and understanding the Nevada standards. Prerequisite: Must have completed EDU 250 and be taking EDEL 313 or EDSC 313. Instructor permission required.

EDUC 406 Curriculum and Assessment Education (3)
Course covers the range of assessments used in elementary schools. Students learn to administer and interpret standardized or norm referenced tests, create appropriate criterion-referenced assessments, portfolios, performance tasks with data-collection, and record-keeping strategies for reporting student academic progress. Nevada Curriculum Standards and state testing instruments will be studied. Prerequisite: Must have completed EDU 250. Instructor permission required.

EDUC 497 Education Workshop Project (1-3)
Specialized instruction designed to develop in-depth understanding of current/emerging aspect in education. Unlimited repeatability.

Electrical Instrumentation Technology (EIT)
  
EIT 233 Introduction to Instrumentation (3-4)
Successful completion of this course will provide the student with an understanding of the concepts of instrumentation as used in industry and why the accompanying skills are an exciting and highly sought after trade. Common pneumatic and electronic instruments that are used to control processes in refineries, power plants, mines, and most manufacturing facilities will be discussed.

EIT 240 Advanced Topics in Instrumentation (2)
Focuses on some of the more specialized instrumentation systems found in industry such as analyzers, weight scales, and wireless systems. Analyzer applications for pH, CO, CO2, NOx, SO2, HCN, and conductivity are becoming more critical to plant processes for environmental reasons. Weight scales are necessary for raw material accounting and inventory. Wireless systems are increasingly demonstrating their usefulness in low cost installations as security issues are resolved. Prerequisite: Must have completed EIT 233.

EIT 315 Pressure, Level, Flow Measurement (4)
Exploration of the physics of pressure, level, and flow. Calculations are derived from formulas that pertain to fluids and solids and used to configure instruments for the purpose of process control. The types of instruments that are presented in this course are found in every industry that produces or manufactures a product. Labs will consist of configuring and calibrating instrumentation to precise standards based on the theory learned in the class lecture. (Formerly EIT 315, Pressure/Level/Flow Measurement and Control) Prerequisite: Must have completed EIT 233.

EIT 323 Installation and Configuration (3)
Provides students with an understanding and practical application of safe and efficient methods of installation and maintenance of process instrumentation. Includes instrument piping, electrical wiring, and mechanical structures as related to physical, chemical, electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic processes. Configuration of control loop elements is included with detailed exercises on ""live"" trainers.

EIT 333 Process (Piping) and Instrument Diagrams (P&ID's) (2)
P&ID drawings are integral to understanding how manufacturing process works. P&IDs are the prelude to loop diagrams and other various schematics. All of these drawings are used by technicians for troubleshooting, wiring, and tubing. Prerequisite: Must have completed EIT 233.

EIT 336 Control Valves and Regulators (4)
The theory and operation of valves and associated pneumatic and hydraulic devices used in the control of gasses and fluids. Prerequisite: Must have completed EIT 233 and EIT 315 and EIT 323 and EIT 333 and EIT 368.

EIT 348 Temperature Measurement and Control (3)
The measurement and control of industrial heat and temperature processes. Prerequisite: Must have completed an Associate of Applied Science or Certificate and EIT 315.

EIT 368 Measurement Systems Analysis (2)
Designed to demonstrate the importance of accurate and reliable measurements in process control systems. Covers how to deal practically with inaccuracies and the methods to minimize the downside effects of inadequate measurement systems. Prerequisite: Must have completed EIT 233 and EIT 315.

EIT 376 CCST Exam Review (1)
Fundamentals of “process control” and brief descriptions of individual processes and combination of processes used in industry. Theory of operation and application of associated process instruments covered. [S/U]

EIT 437 Computer Analog Control (3)
Successful completion of this course will provide the student with an understanding of the concepts pertaining to analog control using Programmable Logic Controllers. Selection of hardware including processor architecture, input/output module wiring, programming, controller installation, and system troubleshooting. Students will learn PID control systems by utilizing PLC hardware/software in a ""live"" process. Loop tuning methodology, controller feed-forward, feedback, cascade, and ratio control will be incorporated on process simulators. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 134 and ELM 136 and EIT 233 and EIT 315 and EIT 323 and EIT 333.

EIT 468 Advanced Control Systems (3)
An applications-oriented conclusion to the Instrumentation Program, including an individualized lab project with selected advanced instrumentation topics. Prerequisite: Must have completed an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate and EIT 348.

Electrical Theory (ELM)
  
ELM 101 Electrical Workforce Training I (1-7)
The first of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. May be repeated for up to seven credits. Instructor permission required.

ELM 102 Electrical Workforce Training II (1-7)
The second of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. May be repeated for up to seven credits. Instructor permission required.

ELM 103 Electrical Workforce Training III (1-7)
The third of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. Instructor permission required.

ELM 104 Electrical Workforce Training IV (1-7)
The fourth of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. Instructor permission required.

ELM 105 Electrical Workforce Training V (1-7)
The fifth of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 104. Instructor permission required.

ELM 106 Electrical Workforce Training VI (1-7)
Sixth of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing the student with online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 105. Instructor permission required.

ELM 107 Electrical Workforce Training VII (1-7)
Seventh of eight courses offered in the Electrical Workforce Training Program. Offers the student a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task assessment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM106. Instructor permission required.

ELM 108 Electrical Workforce Training VIII (1-7)
This course is the eighth of eight courses offered in the electrical Workforce Training Program. The course offers a planned educational experience in the electrical field by providing online electrical craft training, related laboratory experiences, and supervised performance task completion assessment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 107. Instructor permission required.

ELM 112 Electrical Theory, DC (1-4)
The study of matter, atomic structure, electron theory, sources of electricity, and magnetism. Theory and shop application in Ohm's Law, voltage, current, resistance, and power in series, parallel, and series-parallel direct current circuits. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 120 Low Voltage Systems (1-3)
An introduction to low voltage systems used to distribute, carry, capture, and display voice, video, audio, and data signals. Topics include entertainment (video and audio media systems), communications (telephone, fax, modem, networks, and publication address systems), life safety (access control, alarm systems, and video surveillance), environmental control (HVAC and energy management), and automation controls (residential and commercial buildings). Instructor permission required.

ELM 121 Circuit Design (1-2.5)
Developing and drawing electrical diagrams and graphs using standard electrical and JIC symbols. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 112. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 122 AC Theory (4)
Analyze AC series, parallel, and combination circuits with resistance, inductance, and capacitive elements using mathematics, measuring devices, and other test equipment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 112. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 123 Solid State (1-2.5)
Study of the theory and operation of such solid-state devices as diodes, transistors, diacs, triacs, and SCRs. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 122. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 124 DC Generators, Motors, and Controls (2)
Theory, design, applications, and testing of direct current (DC) generators, DC motors, and the study of such DC control devices as manual starting rheostats, reduced-voltage starting mechanisms, and speed controls. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 122. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 125 AC Motors and Alternators (2)
Theory, design, application, and testing of alternating current (AC) motors and alternators; single- and three-phase generation of alternating current; paralleling alternators; and calculating load and power factor characteristics under various load conditions. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 124. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 126 Motor Maintenance (2)
Explores the mechanical aspects of small and larger motor disassembly and assembly; bearing, commutator, slip ring and brush care; electrical maintenance; safety planning; and variable frequency drives. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 125. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 127 Introduction to AC Controls (2.5)
Introduction to pilot devices, wiring diagrams, ladder diagrams, and basic motor circuits. Areas of emphasis include two- and three-wire controls, parallel stop-start, and hand-off automatic controls. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 125. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 128 Transformers and Industrial Lighting (4)
Comprehensive study of the theory and operation of transformers and industrial lighting. The functions of various types of transformers and the maintenance and repair of industrial lighting systems will be emphasized. Perform the actual hookup and testing of basic single-phase and three-phase transformer connections. Observe and demonstrate proper safety and maintenance techniques and develop service wiring techniques. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 122. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 130 Low Voltage Systems II (3)
The second of three courses offered in Low Voltage Systems. Low voltage systems are used to distribute, carry, capture, and display voice, video, audio, and data signals. Industries addressed in the course include entertainment (video and audio medial systems), communications (telephone, fax, modem, networks, and public address systems), life safety (access control, alarm systems, and video surveillance), environmental control (HVAC and energy management), and automation controls (residential and commercial buildings). Topics covered include network cabling, cabling for wireless networks, testing of voice, video and data wiring, and fiber optic systems. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 120.

ELM 131 National Electric Code (2.5)
Survey of the National Electric Code and its application to the safe installation of electrical conductors and equipment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 122. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 132 Digital Concepts (1-2.5)
Introduction to digital electronics including numbering systems, binary codes, Boolean algebra, and logic hardware. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 123. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 133 Advanced AC Controls (4)
Applications and testing of a variety of AC controls, including limit switches, control relays, timing circuits, control transformers, and variable frequency drives. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 127. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 134 Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers (2.5)
Introduction to programmable controller hardware, numbering systems, memory organization, and peripheral devices. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 127 and ELM 132. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 135 National Electric Code 430 (1)
In-depth study of Article 430 of the National Electric Code and its application to motors, motor circuits, and controllers. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 133. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 136 Programmable Controllers Applications (2.5)
Practical experience in programming circuits using relay-type instructions, timers, counters, data manipulation, arithmetic functions, and other advanced features and techniques. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 133 and ELM 134. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 141 Blueprint Reading (2)
Focus on electrical prints, drawings, symbols, and specifications for construction and electrical plans. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 121 and ELM 128. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 142 Raceways (2.5)
Introduction to the types and applications of raceways, wireways, and ducts. Students will learn how to cut, ream, thread, connect, and bend conduit using hand, mechanical, hydraulic, and electric benders. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 143 Wiring Techniques (1-4)
Practical application in a variety of building types and remodeling of existing buildings. Course will include job building, material estimation, tool and material use, and installation techniques. Prerequisite: Must have completed ELM 128 and ELM 131 and ELM 141 and ELM 142. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ELM 198 Special Topics in Electrical Maintenance (1-6)
A special topics course in Electrical Systems Technology to serve a variety of needs. Topics are determined by the course instructor.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
  
EMS 108 EMT (7)
Designed for individuals who anticipate working with an ambulance service, fire department, police department, mining industry or other occupational fields where medical emergencies are common. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be eligible to take the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) examination. (Formerly EMS 108B, Emergency Medical Technician Training) Prerequisite: Current Healthcare Provider CPR card and proof of health insurance. Must be 18 years of age by the time the course is completed. Immunizations: MMR, TD, TB skin test and at least the second Hepatitis B immunization must be submitted the week of class. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 109 EMT Refresher Training (2)
The EMT, 30-hour Refresher Course is offered for individuals who wish to renew their EMT-Basic or Intermediate certification for a two-year period. Each student must complete six online assignments and six tests (passing with a 70% average) prior to scheduling CPR and skills evaluation. Unlimited repeatability. (Formerly EMS 109B, Emergency Medical Services Refresher Course) Prerequisite: Current certification as an EMT. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 110 EMT Instructors Training Course (1)
Trains instructors to teach the U.S. Department of Transportation Basic Training program for Emergency Medical Technician - Basic. Emphasizes the development of teaching skills, rather than emergency care skills. Includes components of the learning process, methods of teaching, preparation and use of various media/materials, and purpose and methods of evaluation. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will have a minimum of 10 hours under the supervision of a currently certified EMS Instruction and be for Nevada EMS Instructor certification. Prerequisite: Current Nevada EMT certification. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 113 First Responder Training Course (3)
Emphasizes development of student skills in patient assessment and emergency care procedures including life-threatening emergencies, injuries to various body parts, emergency childbirth, techniques of moving patients, and more. This course offers a certificate by the State of Nevada Bureau of Licensure and a Certificate as a Nevada Emergency Medical Services First Responder. A certificate will allow students to volunteer with various fire and rescue agencies. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 114 First Responder Refresher (1)
A 16-hour refresher course in emergency medical care. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 118 Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) (10.5)
This course is designed to instruct students to the level of Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) based upon the new National EMS Education Standards. These AEMTs will provide both basic and limited advanced emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system (EMS). AEMTs function as part of the comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. AEMTs perform interventions with the basic and advanced equipment typically found on the ambulance. The AEMT is a vital link in the pre-hospital care system. Prerequisite: Current Nevada EMT certification. Current Healthcare Provider CPR card and proof of health insurance. Must be 18 years of age by the time the course is completed. Immunizations: MMR, TD, TB skin test and at least the second Hepatitis B immunization must be submitted the week of class. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 119 EMT Intermediate 85 to Advanced EMT Bridge Refresher Course (3)
The Emergency Medical Technician Intermediate 85 to Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) Bridge Refresher Course is offered for individuals who wish to bridge from Intermediate 85 to Advanced EMT to meet the new national standards. This course will also serve as a State of Nevada accepted refresher course for re-certification purposes. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EMS 198 Special Topics in Emergency Medical Services (0.5-3)
Selected emergency medical technician topics offered for general interest. No prerequisites. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

English (ENG)
  
ENG 95 Basic Writing II (3)
Designed to develop writing skills. Focuses on the review of grammatical relationships, sentence patterns, punctuation, and usage, with concentration on writing expository paragraphs and essays. Students will have additional Academic Success Center requirements. Upon successful completion of the course, the student may move directly into ENG 101. (Formerly ENG 095, Effective Writing)

ENG 101 Composition I (3)
Critical reading and writing of the expository essay. Emphasizes pre-writing, strategies for organization, and revision. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 95 or ENG 103 or have satisfactory score in accuplacer, ACT or SAT placement tests for ENG 101 or ENG 107.

ENG 102 Composition II (3)
Continuation of English 101. Emphasizes writing from sources, argument, the investigative paper, and research techniques. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 or have satisfactory score in accuplacer, ACT or SAT placement tests for ENG 102.

ENG 103 English Fundamentals for Technical Writing (3)
Emphasizes the essentials of sentence structure, paragraph development, grammar, and punctuation. Class writing assignments apply these essentials to a variety of on-the-job related documents such as memos, letters, and reports. Course is recommended for students seeking certificates of achievement and meets the requirement for a 100-level English course. Upon successful completion of ENG 103, students may move directly into ENG 107 or ENG 101. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ENG 107 Technical Communications I (3)
Basic skills necessary for successful on-the-job communications including improved letter and report writing, persuasion, interviewing, process, mechanism description, and business and technical grammar. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 95 or ENG 103 or have satisfactory score in accuplacer, ACT or SAT placement tests for ENG 101 or ENG 107.

ENG 108 Technical Communications II (3)
Advanced letter and report writing techniques including proper word choice, tone, and structure. Business letters, memorandums, formal and informal reports, process, and mechanism descriptions. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 or ENG 107.

ENG 203 Introduction to Literary Study (3)
Introduction to the elements of fiction, poetry, and drama used in the analysis of literature. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 221 Writing Fiction (3)
The writing of fiction in a workshop setting. Students are required to produce several works of short fiction. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101.

ENG 223 Themes of Literature (3)
Themes and ideas significant in literature. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 250 Introduction to Children's Literature (3)
Study of outstanding children's books to promote ways in which the books can be used to enhance the lives and skills of children, teachers, and parents. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 258 Shakespeare Theatre Festival (1)
A tour to one of the summer festivals to view and study Shakespearean theatre in performance. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 261 Introduction to Poetry (3)
Study of a variety of poets and their techniques. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 299 Special Topics in English (1-3)
Consideration of special topics and issues in English. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. No prerequisite.

ENG 325 Advanced Literary Study (3)
Designed for students who are familiar with basic elements of literature and who have some experience with literary interpretation. Students will examine the major critical approaches to literature and learn to apply these approaches. Students will read and analyze works of fiction, poetry, and drama; write several essays; and one longer paper. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 327 Composition III (3)
A practicum in writing, this course provides instruction in all of the stylistic choices a writer makes to communicate, not only information, but the voice behind the information. Experimentation with sentence patterns, sentence length, word choice, word placement, and punctuation. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 329 Language Study (3)
A consideration of language history, function, and use. Topics include the historical development of languages, language acquisition, descriptive grammar, language controversies, etc. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and one of the following: ANTH 101 or SOC 101 or GEOG 106 or a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 333 Professional Communications (3)
A course in applied rhetoric for students to develop the writing and communication skills they will need as professionals. The goal is to make strong writers with flexible analysis, writing, and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 or ENG 108 with a grade of 'C-' or better.

ENG 411B Principles of Modern Grammar (3)
Principles of modern grammar and usage. Designed for students seeking certification in secondary English. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 416C Special Problems in English (1-6)
Workshops in language, literature, and composition. May be repeated up to two times. (Formerly ENG 429, Special Topics in English) Instructor permission required.

ENG 418A Advanced English Reading Strategies (3)
Designed for the secondary level pre-service education student and/or the actual practicing educator (at either the secondary or post-secondary levels). Its primary aim is to provide a theoretical and practical base for connecting effective reading strategies to the teacher's specific content area of instruction. These strategies will be specifically targeted to the secondary/ post-secondary levels of instruction. Students will be engaged in the effective design and implementation of reading into the delivery of their own content area. Topics to be explored include reading comprehension of expository and narrative texts (especially fiction and literature), developing life-long habits across the realm of reading, integrating reading across all of the language arts (speaking, listening, and writing) as well as across one's content area of instruction. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102.

ENG 433A Shakespeare: Tragedies and Histories (3)
An examination of some of Shakespeare's major tragedies and histories. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 449A British Literature I (3)
Major authors and works in British literature from the beginning through the eighteenth century. The course includes reading and analysis of works of prose, poetry, and drama. This course fulfills the British literature requirement for secondary education majors. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 449B British Literature II (3)
Reading and discussion of major British authors from the Romantic Movement to the present. This course fulfills the British literature requirement for secondary education certification in English. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 451A American Literature I (3)
Major figures and movements from the beginnings of the Civil War. Fulfills the American literature requirement for secondary education certification in English. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 451B American Literature II (3)
Major figures and movements from the Civil War to the present. Fulfills the American literature requirement for secondary certification in English. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

ENG 497A Topics in Multi-Cultural Literature (3)
Reading and analysis of works of fiction, non-fiction, and drama by Asian American, Latin American, Native American, and/or African American writers. This course fulfills the multi-cultural literature requirement for secondary education certification in English. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and 102 and a 200 level literature course (ENG 203 or ENG 223 or ENG 231 or ENG 232 or ENG 250 or ENG 267 or ENG 275).

Energy (ENRG)
  
ENRG 147 Solar Water Heating Systems (3)
This course is designed to train students in the installation, maintenance, and theory of solar hot water heating systems for residential and commercial use. This course focuses on hot water systems for domestic uses. Core topics in this course are workforce safety, solar panel installation, system layout, and hot water heater theory.

Environmental Studies (ENV)
  
ENV 100 Humans and the Environment (3)
Introduction to the relationship of man and his environment. Current thinking and research concerning the impact of industrialization and urbanization on environmental quality, including the population explosion; the potential decline of the affluent society by the depletion of natural resources; the pollution of air, land surface, and water; and the public agencies and policies designed to solve environmental problems. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

ENV 422 Environmental Regulation and Compliance (3)
A review of the important environmental regulations - federal, state, and local - and the processes and methods of compliance with those regulations. The NEPA process is a major component of this course, from points of view of both the regulatory agencies and the entities with activities falling under the regulations.

Education Professional Development (EPD)
  
EPD 162 PPST/Praxis I Reading Review (1)
Designed to prepare prospective teacher education students for the Pre-Professional Skills Test. Organized around the knowledge and skills addressed on the test, this course offers participants opportunity to review and learn the knowledge and skill related to reading comprehension. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EPD 163 PPST/Praxis I Writing Review (1)
Designed to prepare prospective teacher education students for the Pre-Professional Skills test. Organized around the knowledge and skills addressed on the test, this course offers participants opportunity to review and learn the knowledge and skills related to the kinds of writing tested that will be assessed on the Praxis I. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EPD 164 PPST/Praxis I Math Review (1)
Designed to prepare prospective teacher education students for the Pre-Professional Skills Test. Organized around the knowledge and skills addressed on the test, the course offers participants opportunity to review and learn the knowledge and skills related to the mathematics tested on the Praxis I. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

EPD 226 The Tutoring Process (1)
Provides training and understanding of the tutor's role and responsibilities. Topics include tutoring strategies, tutoring options, role modeling, interpersonal communications, questioning skills, and active listening skills. Students also participate in supervised tutorials. Not required as part of the Education Program. [S/U]

EPD 227 Tutoring Methods (1)
Provides advanced application of learning theories relating to one-to-one tutorials. Emphasis is placed on philosophies, procedures, and practices that have proven effective in teaching children in diverse populations. Not required as part of the Education Program. [S/U]

EPD 229 Tutoring Practicum (1-4)
Provides supervised instruction of students in one-to-one tutorials. Students tutor in local schools approximately 15 hours per month and participate in special workshops as required. Not required as part of the Education Program. Class may be repeated up a total of four credits. [S/U]

EPD 230 Passing the ParaPro (1)
Designed to prepare prospective and practicing para-professionals for the ParaPro exam. Organized around the knowledge and skills addressed on the test, this course offers the participant opportunity to collaborate with one another as they learn and review knowledge and skills related to elementary reading, mathematics, and writing. Also addressed are the ways reading, mathematics, and writing skills and knowledge are applied to the paraprofessional as she/he assists in the classroom instruction. [S/U]

EPD 430 Passing the Praxis II (1)
Designed to prepare prospective and current elementary school teachers for the Praxis II examination. Organized around the specifications addressed on the test, this workshop offers participants the opportunity to collaborate with one another as they review pertinent topics related to child development, learning theories, curriculum components, general principles of instruction, classroom management, student assessment, and professional growth. [S/U]

EPD 480 Coaching and Mentoring Student Interns (1-6)
Course is designed to provide support for lead teachers who have volunteered to serve as a cooperating teacher for student interns. Explains and demonstrates different observation models, communication techniques, and evaluation skills. May repeat the course up to six credits. Placement with a student intern is required. [S/U] Instructor permission required.

Education Leadership and Psychology (EPY)
  
EPY 330 Principles of Educational Psychology (3)
General principles, theories, and recent research evidence regarding human development, human learning, and human motivation, especially as they pertain to classroom instruction. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and have sophomore standing.

Electronics (ET)
  
ET 114 Introduction to Robotics (3-6)
This course will take the student through most of the different technologies required to create all forms of robotic technology. A basic start will introduce the student to the basics of electronics, schematic reading, part recognition, electronic measurements and measuring devices, electronic tools, motor (DC and AC), generators (DC and AC), pneumatics and hydraulics, data acquisition (sensoric devices), data handling (reading and controlling data), servo and synchro devices, and robotic design and construction. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ET 270 Electronic Bench Servicing Technician (1-5)
Course emphasizes troubleshooting and repair of electronic components. Students are introduced to soldering and de-soldering techniques, selection and use of test equipment, and interpretation of block schematics as related to electronic circuit repair. Safety is stressed in this electronic service course. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

ET 280 Digital Electronics (1-4)
Covers 10 major areas of digital electronics, including Digital Logic Circuits, Digital Integrated Circuits, Boolean Algebra, Flip-Flops and Registers, Counters, Shift Registers, Arithmetic Circuits, Memories, Digital Systems, and Connecting digital and analog Devices. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Finance Management (FIN)
  
FIN 101 Personal Finance (3)
Discussion and analysis of problems relating to financial independence. Budgeting, personal tax concerns, cash and savings investments, real estate, financial institutions and borrowing, insurance, investing, retirement programs, and estate planning are covered for real world applications.

FIN 240 Introduction to Budgeting (1)
An introduction to financial budgeting for individuals. Topics include the time value of money, the mathematics of finance, the borrowing decision, the lending decision, and capital budgeting. No prerequisites.

FIN 310 Applied Accounting and Finance (3)
Course is designed to provide the student with the keys, concepts, and tools used in understanding the financial functions of a business enterprise. For those students with no previous education or experience in accounting, the course will include an introduction to the essential concepts necessary in understanding formal financial statements from the user's perspective. Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

Film Studies (FIS)
  
FIS 100 Introduction to Film (3)
Introduction to the historical development of film as art. Considers the development of cinematic techniques (i.e., cinematography, editing, sound, etc.), cinematic genres (i.e., the western, romantic comedy, etc.) and narrative elements (i.e., plot, character, conflict, etc.) as exemplified by the work of major American and international directors. [H*]

French (FREN)
  
FREN 101 Conversational French I (3)
Develops a working knowledge of French, listening and speaking skills, and practice in reading and writing. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

FREN 102 Conversational French II (3)
A continuation of FREN 101, this course is designed to be social, interactive, and fun. Introduces the student to the essentials of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture with an emphasis on practical and oral conversation. Additional cultural and listening activities include a French film festival, access to audio and audiovisual tapes, and a French luncheon. Prerequisite: Must have completed FREN 101. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

FREN 111 First Year French I (3-4)
Development of language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and structural analysis. Language practice required. [H*]

FREN 112 First Year French II (3-4)
A continuation of FREN 111. Language practice required. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed FREN 111.

FREN 211 Second Year French I (3)
Continues development of the four basic skills involved in the acquisition of a foreign language: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Also introduces essential elements of French culture. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed FREN 112.

FREN 212 Second Year French II (3)
Continuation of FREN 211. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed FREN 211.

Fire Science (FS)
  
FS 285 Selected Topics in Fire Science (0.5-6)
Elective course in which subjects will vary and cover critical and current issues in fire science. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Geography (GEOG)
  
GEOG 103 Physical Geography (3)
Physical elements of the earth's natural features and their significance to man. Topics include earth form and motion, landforms, weather, climate, vegetation, and soils. Four laboratory experiences required. (Formerly GEOG 103, Geography of the World's Environment) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

GEOG 106 Introduction to Cultural Geography (3)
Analyze the culture regions of the world including physical settings and cultural patterns including language, settlements, socioeconomic patterns, and historical patterns.

Geology (GEOL)
  
GEOL 101 Geology: Exploring Planet Earth (3-4)
Fundamental principles of geology including tectonic and surficial processes, oceans, atmosphere, environmental applications, and resources. Includes a laboratory component. (Formerly GEOL 101, Physical Geology) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96, MATH 97, MATH 120 or higher, or attained satisfactory score for placement into MATH 120 in ACT, SAT or placement tests.

GEOL 102 Earth and Life Through Time (4)
The history of the earth and life as they have evolved together through time: plate tectonics, the physical landscape, and the biosphere. Includes laboratory for evaluating rocks, fossils, and the age of events. Prerequisite: Must have completed GEOL 101.

GEOL 132 Rocks and Minerals (3)
An introduction to the more common or important minerals and rocks. Emphasizes the conditions of formation and hand sample identification. The economic value of minerals and rocks is presented.

GEOL 201 Geology of Nevada (3)
Important geological developments in Nevada that have occurred throughout geologic time. At least one field trip will be required.

GEOL 210 Mineralogy and Crystallography (3)
Crystallography, crystal chemistry, and the origin and determination of ore minerals and rock-forming minerals.

GEOL 299 Special Topics in Geology (1-5)
To be offered on a variety of geological topics as opportunity and demand dictate. Repeatable up to six credits. (Formerly GEOL 299B, Special Topics in Geology) [S/U]

GEOL 334 Geomorphology and Soils (4)
An introduction to the processes and development of landforms and soils as the result of surficial processes operating within the framework of global tectonics. Laboratory work includes methods of analysis of land forms from surface imagining and the study of soils. Includes field trips. Prerequisite: Must have completed GEOL 101.

German (GER)
  
GER 101 Conversational German I (3)
Learn language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and structural analysis. Language practice required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  
GIS 109 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) covering the basic concepts. Principles of cartography and spatial analysis are presented. The intent is to prepare the student for advanced training using specific GIS software.

GIS 110 Principles of Cartography (3)
The basics of analog and digital cartography (map making). Students will be exposed to different types of maps, scales, symbols, and projections and learn how cartography and geographic information systems interact.

GIS 111 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)
Introduces basic remote sensing, aerial photograph interpretation, basic photogrammetry, and satellite image processing. Students will learn the basic techniques of remote sensing and learn how to integrate remote sensing information with GIS techniques and databases.

GIS 205 GIS Applications (3)
This course in Geographic Information Systems concepts covers map components (including a brief discussion of coordinate systems), spatial relationships, and management of relationships description through tabular data. There will be extensive work using spatial and spatial data using ArcView. A knowledge of Windows will be advantageous. Students are advised to take GIS 109 if not familiar with technical program and Windows operating systems.

GIS 212 Intermediate Arcinfo (3)
Offers students exposure to and experience with macro designs, the Arc Macro language, managing tabular data, scripting in ArcGIS, including ArcObjects, and knowledge of various ArcInfo modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed GIS 205 and CIT 129.

GIS 250 GIS Database (3)
Emphasis on creating, using, editing, and managing spatial and attribute data stored in a geodatabase. Lectures and hands-on will emphasize loading data into the geodatabase, defining domains, subtypes, and relationship classes. Applications of geodatabases and geodatatbase management will be explored. Prerequisite: Must have completed GIS 205.

GIS 270 GIS Extensions (3)
Advanced ArcGIS is a course designed for those proficient in ArcGIS and wanting to improve its functionality. Areas of study include the major extensions used in ArcGIS including ArcGIS, Spatial Analyst, 3-D Analyst, and Network Analyst as well as others. Both raster and vector data will be used. Emphasis will be on GIS as a decision making tool. Prerequisite: Must have completed GIS 205.

GIS 290 Portfolios in GIS (3)
Students will focus on job opportunities and career fields in GIS. Current trends and uses of GIS in the workplace will be explored. Students will also create a portfolio of GIS work illustrating their broad understanding of the software including database management, spatial analysis, cartography, and customization. Prerequisite: Must have completed GIS 212 or higher.

GIS 301 Geographic Information Systems Essentials (1)
This course is designed for non-CADD/GIS majors and covers essential concepts in geographic information systems required for a manager of digital technology systems. Students will start work on individual portfolios of their achievements in this degree program. Before taking this course, the student should complete an AAS degree in Computer Technologies. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or higher.

GIS 320 GIS in Business and Community (3)
Basic techniques for geographic analysis and summary of business or community problems. Finding patterns and relationships in tabular and spatial data is emphasized. Popular geographic information systems software will be used for demonstration and for projects. Students will work in teams to identify a problem and to collect data for visualization and analysis of the problem. To present findings, students will create a map layout. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 303 or GIS 109 or GIS 301.

Graphic Communications (GRC)
  
GRC 101 Introduction to Graphic Communications (3)
Introduction to systems and technologies involved in the reproduction of art into various media. Graphic communications history, theory, processes, industry makeup, current and future technologies, and job opportunities.

GRC 103 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
Introduction to the computer as a graphic communications tool using image editing and page layout software. Software literacy, computer graphics terminology, design application, and production are stressed.

GRC 119 Computer Graphics/Digital Media (3)
Introduction to the key digital elements of multimedia. Overview of hardware and software, design principles, and management skills needed to develop dynamic, interactive multimedia products. Knowledge of Windows '95 or later operating system is strongly recommended.

GRC 156 Computer Illustration (3)
Introduction to visual communication as it relates to commercial art using vector-based software with an emphasis on corporate identity. Covers graphic design methodology, layout, typography, symbols, logos, and logo systems developed from thumbnails through final design.

GRC 183 Electronic Imaging (3)
Introduction to digital imagery as a source for creating new images, scanning, and image manipulation. Explores visual communication through technical and conceptual methods. Recommended prerequisite: GRC 103. Also available as ART 243.

GRC 188 Web Animation and Interactivity I (3)
Introduction to animations and interactivity for the Web and mobile devices using Flash. Focuses on planning, design, and production. Topics covered include information architecture, navigational systems, tweens, audio, video, ActionScript, object properties, components, conditional actions, and publishing options. Recommended prerequisite: GRC 156.

GRC 256 Computer Illustration II (3)
Advanced two-dimensional illustration techniques using vector-based graphics software. Graphic projects are created with elements of design and application of principles of design. Recommended prerequisite: GRC 156.

GRC 301 Graphic Communications Management Essentials (1)
Designed for non-graphic majors and covers essential concepts in graphic communications required for a manager of digital technology systems. Students will begin work on individual portfolios of their achievements during this degree program. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree.

GRC 320 Design Methods and Research (3)
Lecture, readings, and studio projects exploring strategies to promote effective design thinking and analysis. Students will produce context-appropriate design solutions that resolve given design challenges in graphics and media, while increasing their technical fluency in industry-standard software applications. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 256 and an AAS degree.

GRC 350 Design Ideation and Process (3)
Course investigates a range of approaches and strategies to enrich the conceptual and exploratory phases of the design process. Studio Projects in digital process drawing and concept rendering. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 256 and an AAS degree.

GRC 360 Typography and Letterforms (3)
The historical context of letterforms and visual languages in type as symbol and image. Exploring typographic form expressing visual concepts and narratives. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 320.

GRC 364 Publication Design (3)
Course covers topics central to the design of long format publications, including layout and design, typography, production technologies and standards, and instruction in industry-standard software applications. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 320.

GRC 365 Web & Interface Design (3)
Instruction in the methods and techniques of website design from concept to completion. Course covers site construction in HTML with cascading style sheets (CSS). Course emphasizes organizational design considerations such as information hierarchy, legibility, and accessibility, while maintaining a professional standard in graphic design treatment. Prerequisite: Must have been accepted into the BAS-GRC Program.

GRC 383 Advanced Multimedia Design: Video and Audio (3)
Covers planning, design, and creation of multimedia projects which include video and audio elements. Student will build on processes learned in prior classes to learn scene creation, transitions, voice over, digital music recording, sound effects, and other techniques. This course culminates in planning, creating, and presenting a project making use of the techniques learned. Prerequisite: Must be in junior standing and have completed GRC 119 or GRC 301 or CIT 303.

GRC 455 Motion Graphics (3)
Explores the expressive potential of motion graphics as a contemporary communication and design medium. Projects and instruction utilizing time-based editing software and emphasizing kinetic composition methods with various visual media and graphic elements. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 350.

GRC 490 Graphic Design/Media Internship (3)
Supervised professional experience in the graphic design, media, or illustration field. At least 135 hours of student work are required. Prerequisite: Fully-admitted major in good standing, completed internship application, appropriate previous coursework, and written consent by program coordinator required for enrollment. Certain internships may require additional prior coursework per faculty advisor recommendation. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 320 and GRC 350 and GRC 360. Instructor permission required.

GRC 492 Individual Studies (3)
Student-initiated in-depth design or media-related work to enhance and focus the portfolio in target areas. Written project proposal, references, relevant student design samples, and proposed production schedule to be submitted in writing prior to enrollment. At least 135 hours of student work are required. Fully-admitted major in good standing, completed individual studies proposal, and appropriate previous coursework required for enrollment. Prerequisite: Must have completed GRC 320 and GRC 350 and GRC 360. Instructor permission required.

Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS)
  
HDFS 201 Lifespan Human Development (3)
Individual development, roles, and interrelationships within the family system through the lifespan.

HDFS 202 Introduction to Families (3)
Study the dynamics of development, interaction, and intimacy for primary relationships in contextual and theoretical frameworks. Review societal issues and choices facing diverse family systems and individuals living within families. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be taking ECE 250.

HDFS 232 Diversity in Children (3)
The course considers the development of young children from the prenatal period through age eight, focusing in particular on diversity among children. Diversity will be explored in the terms of cultural, ethnic, and linguistic variations as well as differences in ability and typical and atypical development. (Formerly HDFS 232, Diversity and the Young Child) Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250.

Home Economics (HEC)
  
HEC 122 Creative Cooking (1-3)
From sourdough to haute cuisine to regional cooking and crepes suzette, class combines good nutrition and economical shopping tips with a variety of cooking techniques and recipes. Unlimited repeatability. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

History (HIST)
  
HIST 101 U.S. History to 1877 (3)
Survey of U.S. political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development from Colonial Times through Reconstruction. When taken with HIST 102 or 217, class satisfies the United States Constitution requirement. (Formerly HIST 101, U.S. History to 1865)

HIST 102 U.S. History Since 1877 (3)
Survey of U.S. political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development from 1877 to the present. Includes examination of Nevada Constitution and, when taken with HIST 101, satisfies the U.S. and Nevada Constitution requirement. (Formerly HIST 102, U.S. History 1865 to Present)

HIST 105 European Civilization I to 1648 (3)
Survey of the development of Western civilization from the dawn of human history to 1648. [H*]

HIST 106 European Civilization to Present (3)
Survey of the development of Western civilization from 1648 to the present. [H*]

HIST 217 Nevada History (3)
Nevada history from early exploration to the present. Includes examination of the Nevada Constitution and satisfies the Nevada Constitution requirement.

HIST 247 Introduction to the History of Mexico (3)
A review of pre-Columbian, Colonial, and Mexican national history with emphasis on culture and politics.

HIST 295 Special Topics in History (1-3)
Course may utilize special emphasis topics/instructors or be offered as an individualized study format with directed readings. Classes will usually mirror offerings at other NSHE institutions.

HIST 417C The West as National Experience (3)
Historical development of the American West utilized to examine contemporary issues of resources and ownership, demographic change, and national myth-making. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101 or (HIST 101 and HIST 102).

HIST 441 American Environmental History (3)
Explores the relationships between human beings and the physical environment on the North American continent. Examines how different cultural groups have used and transformed the continent. Examines the ebb and flow of environmental consciousness from its roots in the nineteenth century to the rise of environmentalism in the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101 or (HIST 101 and HIST 102).

HIST 458 Roman Civilization (3)
Analyzes all aspects of Roman history from earliest times to the late antique period, with central attention to the politics and society of the later Republic and how Rome became the monarchy of the Caesars. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101 or (HIST 101 and HIST 102).

HIST 478B Islamic and Middle Eastern History since 1750 (3)
An examination of the Middle East from the 18th century to recent times. The predominant focus will be on how the indigenous leadership and peoples of the region grappled with the challenges posed by the advent of the modern world. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101 or (HIST 101 and HIST 102).

HIST 498 Advanced Historical Studies (1-3)
Course may utilize special emphasis topics or be offered as an individualized study format with directed readings. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101 or (HIST 101 and HIST 102).

Health Information Technology (HIT)
  
HIT 100 Introduction to ICD-9-CM Coding (2)
Introduction to the mechanics of using ICD-9-CM medical coding. Procedures for assigning code numbers, guidelines for use and interpreting coding rules, and regulations that govern ICD-9-CM coding. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 140. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

HIT 101 Current Procedural Terminology (3)
An introduction to outpatient procedural coding. The student will be introduced to HCFA's HCPCS three-level coding system, including basic coding guidelines and practice using CPT-4. Designed to meet the needs of the medical record practitioner in hospital medical record/billing departments, physicians' offices, and insurance companies for both reimbursement and research needs. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 140. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Human Services (HMS)
  
HMS 101 Introduction to Human Services (3)
An overview of human services as a profession, including the exploration of the history of the helping relationship, the human services movement, current influences of technology, managed care, and models of service delivery. Emphasis is on discovering employment in the human services, self-assessment activities, and development of interpersonal skills common to human services providers.

HMS 102 Introduction to Counseling (3)
Assessment, interviewing, intervention, referral, and documentation skills related to client communications in human services professions are emphasized. Students receive HIPPA training in basic client/patient confidentiality. Course is required for HMS 106, Human Services Practicum.

HMS 105 Substance Abuse Counseling Methods (3)
Addiction counseling theory and application methods for addiction counselors, social services/human services/health sciences students, or for anyone interested in developing skills for assisting individuals, couples, and families with substance abuse issues. Prior completion of HMS 102, or the equivalent, is highly recommended.

HMS 107 Small Group Interaction Techniques (3)
Theory and methods of group dynamics and group interaction applications in social/human services settings are explored. Group leadership skills related to addiction treatment, relapse prevention, grief and loss adjustment, problem-solving, and personal development are emphasized.

HMS 200 Ethics in Human Services (3)
Real life applications for personal and professional boundaries, beliefs, ethics, values, morals, and codes of conduct in human relationships using ethical decision-making, problem-solving, and critical-thinking activities are emphasized. This course may be repeated up to three times for continuing education credit. (Check with individual licensing boards prior to registering.)

HMS 205 Human Services Practicum I (5)
This Human Services Practicum course will allow students to begin preparing for their entry into Human Services Practicum II. During this phase students will be completing the application process for their practicum, backgound checks, reference letters, visiting a variety of mental health agencies, securing a site for their final practicum, observing professionals and clients of those agencies to gain a better understanding of real world experiences in human services. Includes one lecture contact hour and 12 clicincal practice /observation hours per week. (Formerly HMS 106, Human Services Practicum I) Practicum application approval required. Prerequisite: Must have completed all general educational courses. Prerequisite: Must have completed HMS 101 and HMS 102 and HMS 200. Instructor permission required.

HMS 206 Human Services Practicum II (5)
Advanced human services skills development through interaction with clients, client support systems, and other human service professionals within community agencies. Includes one lecture contact hour and twelve clinical practicum hours per week. Practicum application approval required. Prerequisite: Must have completed HMS 101 and HMS 102 and earned a grade of B- or higher in HMS 205. Instructor permission required.

HMS 250 Human Services Seminar (3)
Explores emerging issues and current trends in human services employment as they relate to the student's goals, interests, and abilities. This course is required for students seeking an AAS degree in Human Services but is open to any student who is or desires to be involved in human services work. Students create a career plan; develop a resume based on skills training, employment experiences, and current job opportunities; and practice job interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: Must have completed HMS 101 and HMS 102. Instructor permission required.

Humanities (HUM)
  
HUM 101 Introduction to Humanities I (3)
An introduction to humanities through a study of seven major arts including film, drama, music, literature, painting, sculpture, and architecture. Each of these arts is considered from the perspective of historical development, the elements used in creating works of art, meaning and form, and criticism and critical evaluation. [H*]

HUM 111 Gateway to the Humanities (3)
Through five distinct modules, students discover answers to all of the following questions: What attributes are irreducibly human - that is, independent of gender, race, culture, society, nationality, or philosophy? How do human beings relate to one another? How do we humans express ourselves? In what ways do we limit ourselves? The student will explore: philosophy/religion; language/linguistics; history; art and architecture; law and ethics; and literature/performance. Students will seek out applications of the humanities to chosen disciplines.

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
  
HVAC 101 Introduction to Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (3)
A lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course introducing the basics and theory of heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration. In addition to the basic theory, students will also learn basic tools of the industry and how they are used, basic electricity, circuits, wiring, ohms, amps, watts, and resistance will be covered. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Integrative Studies (INT)
  
INT 100 GBC Orientation (0.5)
An introduction to GBC and its programs and services. The goal of the course is to achieve student success. (Required for first-time full-time students and for part-time degree-seeking students before they complete 24 credits.) No prerequisite. [S/U]

INT 105 Volunteering in Your Community (0.5)
Provides the student with an opportunity to perform several hours of community service and to then reflect on both the personal experience of giving of oneself and on volunteerism in general. Repeatable up to four times. [S/U]

INT 106 Job Search and Resume Preparation (0.5)
Exploration of job search techniques, determination of the most effective resume format, and preparation of an appropriate resume and cover letter for a prospective career. [S/U]

INT 295 Educational Travel (1-6)
The study of people, art, music, culture, and history through travel. Unlimited repeatability. [S/U]

INT 301 Integrative Research Methodology (3)
An interdisciplinary integration of research methods in the natural sciences, social sciences, and history. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and have completed (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher or AMS 310 or STAT 152).

INT 339 Integrative Humanities Seminar (3)
An integrative seminar on topics in the humanities. The topics will vary to address needs and interests of programs. Course fulfills the upper-division integrative humanities general education requirements. May be repeated once for credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 116 or MATH 120 or Math 126 or higher or AMS 310 or STAT 152).

INT 349 Integrative Social Science Seminar (3)
An integrative seminar on topics in the social sciences. The topics will vary to address needs and interests of programs. Course fulfills the upper-division integrative social sciences general education requirements. May be repeated once for credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 116 or MATH 120 or Math 126 or higher or AMS 310 or STAT 152).

INT 359 Integrative Math Seminar (3)
An integrative seminar on topics in mathematics. The topics will vary to address needs and interests of programs. May be repeated once for credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and have completed (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher or AMS 310 or STAT 152).

INT 369 Integrative Science Seminar (3)
An integrative seminar on topics in science. The topics will vary to address needs and interests of programs. Course fulfills the upper-division integrative science general education requirements. May be repeated once for credit if the topics are different. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and have completed (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher or AMS 310 or STAT 152).

INT 400 Internship in Integrative Studies (3-6)
A semester placement within a student's concentration (emphasis) area. The internship requires an integration of work experience and a course of study in a specific emphasis area. May be taken for credit more than once, but no more than a total of six credit hours of INT 400 may be counted toward the BA degree. Prerequisite: Must have senior standing and have declared Bachelor of Arts in Integrative Studies and have completed INT 301. Instructor permission required.

INT 496 Capstone in Integrative Studies (3)
The application of communication skills, core course knowledge, critical thinking, analysis, and other program skills to conducting an independent research project. The course involves intensive self-directed research and requires students to write an extensive senior paper. Prerequisite: Must be in senior standing, have declared a Bachelor of Arts in Integrative Studies, and have completed INT 301 and INT 400. Instructor permission required.

Information Systems (IS)
  
IS 101 Introduction to Information Systems (3)
Introduction to computer-based information systems management including hardware/software relationships, business applications usage, systems theory, current technology, networking, the Internet, computer security, and privacy issues. Recommended corequisite: IS 201.

IS 201 Computer Applications (3)
An introduction to the most commonly used microcomputer business software with emphasis on operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, database management, presentation software, and software integration. Substantial hands-on work provides practical experience using this software. Recommended corequisite: IS 101.

IS 301 Management Information Systems (3)
The fundamentals of design, implementation, control, evaluation, and strategic use of computer-based information systems for business data processing, office automation, information reporting, and decision making. Emphasizes managerial and strategic aspects of information technology with some hands-on work using information management software. Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or higher.

Industrial Millwright Technology (IT)
  
IT 103 Industrial Pump Technology (1-4)
A one-to-four-credit laboratory and lecture course covering various industrial pumps. Emphasis is on centrifugal pump maintenance and repair and introductory hydraulic engineering concepts that pertain to centrifugal pumps. Pump seals, packing techniques, and bearings are also discussed. Unlimited Repeatability. (Formerly IT 103B, Mill Pump Technology) Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 105 Mechanical Power Transmission (1-4)
A one-to-four-credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course in the study and application of bearings, belt and mechanical drives, chain and chain drives, couplings, clutches, gears, and fluids in the transmission of power used in the industrial processes. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 106 Millwright and Process Terminology (1.5)
A lecture, discussion, and laboratory course designed to introduce students to millwright and process terminology. Students will learn basic terminology and functions of primary process equipment and their sub-components. This will include Ag mills, Sag mills, autoclaves, roasters, crushers, conveyors, and power plant components. Material flow within process plants will also be covered. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 201 Blueprint Reading and Measurement Fundamentals (1-4)
A one-to-four credit laboratory and lecture course covering blueprint reading fundamentals for mechanical and construction drawings. Also, an introduction to different types of measuring instruments and their proper uses in industry. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 207 Boiler, Conveyor, and Pneumatic Systems (1-5.5)
A one to five-point-five credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course in the study and application of boiler, conveyer, and pneumatic systems. The course will cover operation, maintenance, and repair of boiler, conveyer, and pneumatic systems. Safety is emphasized. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 208 Fluid Power (1-9)
A review of fluid power mechanics with an emphasis on schematic symbols, circuit operation and design, hydraulic component theory and operation, and hydraulic terminology. Course may be taught in modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 or TA 100. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 210 Failure Analysis and Predictive/Preventive Maintenance (4)
A four-credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course in the study of predictive and preventive maintenance techniques. Emphasis will be placed on root cause analysis, vibration analysis, and the proper use of lubrication to prevent failures. Prevention of maintenance problems through predictive methods will be emphasized. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 212 Inventory and Planning (1-2)
A one-to-two-credit lecture designed to acquaint the student with the principles of planned maintenance and inventory control as it relates industrial maintenance. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 214 Basic Electrical Theory for Industial Mechanics (4)
A four-credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course in the diagnosis of common electrical problems associated with industrial equipment. The course covers basic AC/DC electrical theory, electrical motor maintenance, motor control, and uses of electrical tools for troubleshooting. Prerequisite: Must have completed IT 216. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 216 Basic Metallurgy (4)
A four-credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course which emphasizes the practical approach to the basic principles of metallurgy. The course explores the behavior of metals subjected to metallurgical processes and explains how desired material properties are attained. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 220 Alignment Principles (1-4)
Study and practice and shaft and gear alignments using the four-step method to align and correct misalignments as a procedure to extend the life of bearings, couplings, and seals, and to reduce vibration in equipment and components and gears. Tools and equipment used in the course include dial indicators, and electronic and laser measuring devices. Safety is emphasized. Unlimited repeatability. Prerequisite: Must have completed IT 103. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

IT 299 Special Topics in Industrial Technology (2)
A special topics course in Industrial Millwright Technology to serve a variety of needs. Topics are determined by the course instructor.

Journalism (JOUR)
  
JOUR 102 News Reporting and Writing (3)
Principles of researching news stories, gathering information in the appropriate arenas and writing clear and accurate articles in accordance with journalistic standards established by the Associated Press. Explores the roles and responsibilities of a reporter for a news organization in keeping the public informed as well as acting as a watchdog. Examines ethical concerns in journalism and legal issues that influence media coverage.

JOUR 105 News Production I (3)
Course designed to qualify students to produce the college newspaper, literary magazine, or any other student publication. Combination of graphics and journalism in one class period which will familiarize students with the total makeup of the newspaper assembly procedures. (Formerly JOUR 105, Publications Workshop I)

JOUR 106 News Production II (3)
A continuation of JOUR 105. (Formerly JOUR 106, Publications Workshop II)

JOUR 120 Introduction to Broadcasting (3)
A survey of the principles and trends involved in radio and television broadcasting, cable, and other electronic media, including history, regulation, programming, and business practices. Examines communication theories, legal, ethical, and socio-cultural issues as well as career potential in the present and future electronic cultures. (Formerly COM 120, Introduction to Broadcasting)

JOUR 124 Introduction Broadcast News and Production (3)
Techniques of gathering, writing, editing, and producing news for radio and television. Topics include broadcast style, working with wire services, codes of ethics, legal considerations, and news applications of audio and video technology. Students experience all aspects of studio newscast production from producing to anchoring.

JOUR 125 Electronic News Gathering/Video Editing (3)
An introduction to all elements involved in field reporting for television news. Topics include contacting and selecting the most appropriate sources, interviewing techniques, selecting sound-bites, visual storytelling, developing on-camera, as well as as behind-the-camera skills, and ethical and legal considerations. Students will create voice-overs and packages using non-linear digital video editing equipment.

JOUR 201 Television Studio Production I (3)
Study and hands-on training in basic television studio and control room operations for live and live-to-tape multi-camera productions. Students experience all positions in a production crew including producing, directing, camera, audio, lighting, switching, and learning the underlying principles of video technology. (Formerly COM 201, Television Production)

JOUR 205 Television Field Production I (3)
Techniques of shooting video and television programs and segments single-camera-film style, on location, rather than in a multi-camera studio. Students learn the necessary preproduction planning steps including location scouting, storyboarding, and budgeting; then progress to digital video field production, including camera, audio, and lighting practices. Projects will be edited using Adobe Creative Suite Production Premium non-linear editing software.

JOUR 290 Internship in Journalism (1-3)
Limited to students interested in a career in broadcast journalism. To participate, students must fill out an internship application, meet with an intern advisor, and interview with internship sponsor and instructors. Interns will not be compensated and hours will be determined by enrollment credits. Instructor permission required.

JOUR 298 Advanced Video Production and Editing (3)
Advanced techniques in pre-production, production, and post-production for single-camera-film-style digital video and television short program creation. Topics include field camera operations, audio set-up, and lighting techniques for unusual or adverse conditions, troubleshooting, and continuity shooting. Students learn complex editing techniques and digital audio and video special effects. Prerequisite: Must have completed JOUR 205.

Library (LIB)
  
LIB 101 Research Skills for College Papers (1)
An overview of basic research strategies using Internet, electronic, and print resources. Focus is on gathering viable information for college assignments. (Formerly LT 101B, Library Skills/Research for College Papers) [S/U]

LIB 150 Introduction to Library Technology (3)
A study of library tools such as indexes, bibliographies, reference books, and inter-library loan procedures. Library equipment use is also included. For students desiring to develop skills in the use of libraries and who are interested in a career in librarianship. (Formerly LT 150B, Introduction to Library Technology I) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

LIB 299 Special Topics Library (1)
Consideration of special topics in library and information science. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Mathematics (MATH)
  
MATH 91 Basic Mathematics (3)
The fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, percentages, measurement, and integers. Intended to provide a review of basics needed in later math courses and on the job.

MATH 95 Elementary Algebra (3)
A first course in algebra for students who plan to continue in the math sequence. Topics include operations on real numbers, simplifying expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, radicals, and the concept of graphing. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 91 or earned a satisfactory score for placement into MATH 95 or MATH 97.

MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra (3)
This is a second course in algebra for students who have completed one elementary algebra course. The topics covered include polynomials, rational functions, linear equations and inequalities, absolute value inequalities, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, relations and functions, systems of equations, and applications. This is a developmental course. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 95 or have earned a satisfactory score in Accuplacer, ACT or SAT placement tests for MATH 96.

MATH 97 Elementary and Intermediate Algebra (5)
A one-semester course equivalent to the combination of MATH 095 and MATH 096. Topics include solving linear equations in one variable, polynomials, integer exponents, factoring, rational expressions and equations, graphic linear equations in two variables, inequalities, systems of linear equations, radicals and rational exponents, and quadratic equations. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 91 or earned a satisfactory score for placement into MATH 95 or MATH 97.

MATH 116 Technical Mathematics I (3)
Provides technical mathematical core material so that the student gains practical problem solving experience. May include arithmetic operation, integers, exponents, scientific notation, algebraic expressions, equations, metric system, trigonometry, and logarithms. This course satisfies the general education requirement for occupational/technical AAS degree. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 95 or MATH 97 or earned a satisfactory score for placement into MATH 96 or MATH 116.

MATH 120 Fundamentals of College Mathematics (3)
Includes real numbers, consumer mathematics, variation, functions, relations, graphs, geometry, probability, and statistics. Course is broad in scope, emphasizing applications. Fulfills the lower-division mathematics requirement for a Bachelor of Arts Degree. Satisfies mathematics requirement for baccalaureate degrees. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or MATH 97 or earned a satisfactory Accuplacer, ACT, or SAT score for placement into MATH 120 or have completed MATH 95 and ENG 101 with a 'C' or better.

MATH 122 Number Concepts for Elementary School Teachers (3)
A course for students preparing for elementary school teaching or those who already hold teaching certificates. Topics include the real number system and its subsystems, algorithms, primes and divisibility, algebraic thinking, and a variety of applications. The course presumes mathematical knowledge of the material and goes more in depth giving backgrounds for the real number system and preparation of students for teaching the material. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 120.

MATH 123 Statistical and Geometrical Concepts for Elementary School Teachers (3)
A course for students preparing for elementary school teaching or for those who already hold teaching certificates. Topics include probability, statistics, geometry, constructions, similar figures, trigonometric ratios, areas and volumes, motion geometry, and a variety of applications. Backgrounds for the concepts and preparation of students for teaching the material. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 120 or MATH 122.

MATH 126 Precalculus I (3)
A third course in algebra, intended for those who are majoring in a science field, a business-related field, or mathematics; as part of a mathematics endorsement for elementary education; or for students who are going on to calculus. This course stresses functions, including their graphs and applications, polynomial functions, radicals, rational functions, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This is the first half of a two-semester sequence. MATH 126 and MATH 127 together, or MATH 126 and STAT 152 together, satisfy the mathematics requirement for an Associate of Science degree; also see the bachelor's degree requirements. This course satisfies the College Algebra requirement for programs that require College Algebra and Statistics. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or MATH 97 or earned a satisfactory score in Accuplacer, ACT, or SAT tests for placement into MATH 126 or MATH 128.

MATH 127 Precalculus II (3)
A course intended for those majoring in a science field or mathematics, as part of a mathematics endorsement for elementary education, or for students going on to calculus. Topics include circular functions, their graphs, and applications; trigonometric identities and equations; conic sections; complex numbers; matrices; sequences and mathematical induction. This is the second half of a two-semester sequence. The two semesters satisfy the mathematics requirement for a bachelor's degree. The two-course sequence, MATH 126 and MATH 127, are equivalent to MATH 128 at UNR or UNLV. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or earned a satisfactory score in Accuplacer, ACT, or SAT test for placement into MATH 127.

MATH 128 Precalculus and Trigonometry (5)
Includes equations, relations, functions, graphing; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and circular functions with applications; coordinate geometry of lines and conics; analytic trigonometry; matrices and determinants; and binomial theorem.It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or MATH 97 or earned a satisfactory score in Accuplacer, ACT, or SAT tests for placement into MATH 126 or MATH 128.

MATH 181 Calculus I (4)
The fundamental concepts of analytic geometry and calculus functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, integrals, and certain applications. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed (MATH 126 and MATH 127) or MATH 128.

MATH 182 Calculus II (4)
A continuation of MATH 181. The course covers transcendental functions, methods of integration, conic sections, sequences and series, and vectors. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 181.

MATH 251 Discrete Mathematics I (3)
Topics include set operations, Cartesian product relations and functions, equivalence relation, graphs and digraphs, propositional calculus, truth tables, mathematical induction, and elementary combinatorics. Applications are made to probability. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within three years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 182.

MATH 283 Calculus III (4)
A continuation of MATH 182. Topics include infinite sequences and series, vectors, differentiation and integration of vector-valued functions, the calculus of functions of several variables, multiple integrals and applications, line and surface integrals, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and the Divergence Theorem. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 182.

MATH 285 Differential Equations (3)
Theory and solving techniques for general ordinary differential equations, first order and second order linear equations, boundary value problems, power series solutions, Laplace transforms, and system of first order equations. Emphasis on real world phenomena. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 283.

MATH 310 Introduction to Analysis I (3)
A re-examination of the calculus of functions of one-variable: real numbers, convergence, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 283.

MATH 314 History of Mathematics (3)
Evolution of mathematics from ancient numeral systems to twentieth-century mathematics. The effects of culture on mathematics and the impact of mathematics on cultures also considered. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 330.

MATH 330 Linear Algebra (3)
An introduction to linear algebra, including matrices and linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within three years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 182.

MATH 331 Groups, Rings, and Fields (3)
Elementary structure of groups, rings, and fields, including homeomorphisms, normal subgroups, and ideals. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 330.

MATH 333 Number Theory for Secondary School Teachers (3)
Examines in detail the structure of number systems and polynomials over these number systems, and teaches the careful art of mathematical reasoning. The course is designed for those who will make the transition from techniques courses to conceptual mathematics. Designed for prospective high school teachers but is open to other students. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 182.

MATH 352 Probability and Statistics (3)
Probability experiments; sample spaces, discrete and continuous random variables and distributions; mathematical expectation, central limit theorem; hypothesis testing, and linear regression. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 181 and MATH 182.

MATH 475 Euclidean and Non Euclidean Geometry (3)
Axiom systems, models, independence, consistency; incidence, distance betweenness, congruence, convexity, inequalities, parallels, perpendiculars, the Klein model; Saccheri quadrilaterals, limit triangles, and the non-Euclidean geometry of Bolyai-Lobatchevsky. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 333.

Medical Coding and Billing (MCOD)
  
MCOD 110 Introduction to Medical Coding and Billing (3)
An introduction to Medical Coding and Billing, technology and the medical professional, and learning about documentation, confidentiality, and ethics. Instructor permission required.

MCOD 120 Medical Terminology and Healthcare Environment (3)
Designed for students to master medical terminology and learn the history of coding and billing. Instructor permission required.

MCOD 130 Introduction to Anatomy, Pathophysiology, Disease Processes, and Pharmacology (5)
Designed as an introduction to pharmacology, anatomy, pathophysiology and disease processes. Instructor permission required.

MCOD 140 Health Care Structure and Medical Record Content (3)
Designed as an introduction to healthcare structure. Provides an overview of detailed information of each report in the outpatient medical record, and will also present the composition of each of the report types and how they relate to medical coding and billing. Instructor permission required.

MCOD 200 Introduction to Diagnostic Coding (3)
Introduction to Basic Diagnosis Coding. Learn to navigate the code book and find official addition coding conventions and general coding guidelines. Prerequisite: Must have completed MCOD 110 and MCOD 120 and MCOD 130 and MCOD 140.

MCOD 210 Exploring Reimbursement and Procedural Coding and Billing (5)
Explores healthcare reimbursement and provides detailed information about the various types of payment systems used to reimburse outpatient services. Introduction to the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codebook. Prerequisite: Must have completed MCOD 110 and MCOD 120 and MCOD 130 and MCOD 140.

MCOD 220 Skill Building for Outpatient Coding (6)
Skill building for outpatient coding of actual outpatient medical records. Prerequisite: Must have completed MCOD 110 and MCOD 120 and MCOD 130 and MCOD 140.

Management (MGT)
  
MGT 103 Introduction Small Business Management (3)
Environment and management of the small business enterprise, problems in initiating the business, financial and administrative control, marketing programs and policies, management of business operations, legal and governmental relationships.

MGT 201 Principles of Management (3)
Fundamentals and principles of management, administrative policies, objectives and procedures, and problem of organization and leadership.

MGT 283 Introduction Human Resource Management (3)
Duties and responsibilities of personnel management. Areas covered include employee needs, human relationships, orienting and training employees, benefit programs, and economics of supervision. (Formerly MGT 283, Personnel Administration)

MGT 310 Foundations of Management Theory and Practice (3)
Develops the students' theoretical foundation for further study in any field involving management. Explores historical thought and the management functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. Provides a practical analysis of leadership, communications, and motivation techniques. Concludes with an exploration of current management challenges and trends. Prerequisite: Must have sophomore standing or higher.

MGT 323 Organizational and Interpersonal Behavior (3)
A study of the interpersonal relations between individuals and groups in an organizational setting. Topics include leadership styles and techniques, organizational design, communication, decision making, motivation, perception, group behavior, and coping with stress. Prerequisite: Must have completed MGT 310.

MGT 330 Business and Technology (3)
This course will cover the relationship between advances in technology and the creation of wealth from the new business opportunities that result from technical innovations. It will cover the basic principles from a historical perspective and then require students to apply those principles to emerging technological innovations. Emphasis will be of the acceleration of technological innovations resulting market place competition in their application to the satisfaction of economic needs. Prerequisite: Must have completed MGT 310.

MGT 367 Human Resource Management (3)
Analysis of the personnel policies of business enterprises. Areas of study include recruitment, selection, placement, training, promotion, morale, employee services, compensation, labor relations, and organization and function of human resource departments. Prerequisite: Must have completed MGT 310.

MGT 430 Management Technology Leadership (3)
This course will teach the basic principles and techniques of identifying and adopting technological advances that have the potential to provide organizations with sustained competitive advantage. The leadership role of managers in being champions of change will be emphasized. Topics covered will include scanning the technological environment, technological forecasting, adoption of innovations and practicing technological leadership by integrating those innovations into the organization's operations, goods and services. Prerequisite: Must have completed MGT 310.

MGT 441 Operational Quality Control and Problem Solving (3)
Operational quality control and problem solving in the workplace. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 181 or STAT 152.

MGT 487 Entrepreneurship (3)
A comprehensive study of the process of judiciously combining the various factors of production in meeting the needs of consumers in creative and profitable ways. Topics include characteristics of successful managers, starting a new enterprise, forming an entrepreneurial team, venture capital sources, and formulation of a business plan. Prerequisite: Must have completed MGT 310.

Marketing (MKT)
  
MKT 127 Introduction to Retailing (3)
Intended for those who desire a broad view of retailing from a management point of view. Surveys retailing principles and concepts, and covers store and merchandise management. Topics include store location and organization, personnel, pricing, inventory control, customer service, advertising, promotion, and display. Makes use of case studies and practical situation exercises.

MKT 210 Marketing Principles (3)
Study of problems of manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers in the market of goods and services, channels of marketing, customer relations, functions of sales departments, price policies, and communications.

MKT 211 Introduction to Professional Sales (3)
Selling, including buying behavior, product knowledge, prospecting, developing the sales presentation, handling objections, closing the sale, and the personal characteristics required for success. Skills and processes necessary for selling a product or service are applied to special marketing segments: retail, industrial, governmental, and international markets.

Metals (MTL)
  
MTL 101 Basic Machine Shop I (4)
Learn the basics of work setup, machine operation, turning, threading, broaching, and boring operations. Students will also learn interpretation of and uses of formulas and charts associated with the machine trades. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

MTL 102 Basic Machine Shop II (4)
A four-credit lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course in the study of machine operations used in the reconstruction and repair of industrial equipment. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Music (MUS)
  
MUS 101 Music Fundamentals (3)
Notation, terminology, intervals, and scales. Designed to furnish a foundation for musicianship. Recommended for teachers in public schools and all others desiring a basic music background. (Formerly MUS 101, Music Fundamentals and Ear Training) [F*]

MUS 103 Voice Class I (1)
Fundamentals of tone production, breath control, pronunciation, and practical techniques for interpreting songs. May be repeated for a total of four credits. [F]

MUS 104 Voice Class II (2)
A continuation of MUS 103 introducing the Italian art song. [F]

MUS 111 Piano Class I (2-3)
Beginning piano class. Music reading and keyboard techniques from beginning through early intermediate levels. No previous musical training required. (Formerly MUS 111, Piano I) [F]

MUS 121 Music Appreciation (3)
The historical and cultural background of music and origins to the twentieth century. [H*]

MUS 125 History of Rock Music (3)
The history and stylistic development of rock from its origins, through transitions, and subsequent revolutions. [H*]

MUS 175 Rock Jazz Ensemble (1-2)
Ensemble members will perform a variety of music, ranging from early jazz styles and standards to contemporary fusion. There will be considerable opportunity for reading music and ad-lib soloing, to increase exposure and the skill level of the performers. The ensemble will vary each semester depending on instrumentalists enrolled and may provide opportunities for vocalists. Some music theory and notation will be studied. Repeatable up to six credits.

MUS 203 Music Theory I (4)
Counterpoint and harmony (written and keyboard). [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed MUS 101

MUS 204 Music Theory II (4)
A continuation of MUS 203. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed MUS 203.

MUS 299 Special Topics in Music (0.5-6)
Consideration of special topics in issues and music. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

MUS 301 Music Theory III (3)
An advanced class in tonal theory which includes the study of enriched harmonic resources of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as well as an introduction to counterpoint and large musical forms. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed MUS 203 and MUS 204.

Music (MUSA)
  
MUSA 145 Voice - Lower Division (1)
Private vocal instruction. (Formerly MUS 153, Voice) [F]

Music (MUSE)
  
MUSE 101 Concert Choir (1-2)
Performance of representative choral music of all periods. [F]

MUSE 108 Concert Singers (1)
Performance of representative choral music of all periods. [F]

Natural Resource and Environmental Science (NRES)
  
NRES 150 Fundamentals of Plant Science (3)
An introduction to plant science including structure, growth process, propagation, growth media, biological competitors, and physical and chemical surroundings of the environment, including soils and practices in the modern world.

NRES 222 Soils (3)
Introductory course providing an understanding of soils structures, properties, formations, and composition as it relates to plants and other environmental aspects. Emphasis will be placed on study soils from a land use and management perspective. (Formerly NRS 101, Introduction to Soil Science) Prerequisite: Must also be enrolled in NRES 223

NRES 223 Soils Laboratory (1)
Designed to complement NRES 222 lecture course. This one-credit hour course is presented to provide students with hands-on laboratory and field experiences to better understand the science and management of soils. Designed to complement NRES 222 lecture course. Prerequisite: Must also be enrolled in NRES 222.

NRES 241 Principles of Range Management (3)
Basic principles of range management as they apply and relate to livestock production, conservation practices and wildlife management, regional vegetation types and range sites, and grazing systems along with considerations of multiple range uses. (Formerly NRS 100, Introduction to Principles of Natural Resources)

NRES 251 Rangeland Measurements and Monitoring (4)
Designed to instruct students in livestock and plan management on rangelands. Provides instruction in the most common and acceptable rangeland monitoring systems. Students will participate in actual rangeland monitoring and plant/data collection. (Formerly NRES 215, Principles of Rangeland Management and Monitoring)

NRES 299 Special Topics in Natural Resources (1-6)
Various short courses (one-to-six credits) covering a variety of subjects in natural resources. May be repeated up to nine credits.

NRES 310 Wildlife Ecology and Management (4)
Wildlife ecology is the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Wildlife management is the practice of balancing the needs of wildlife and other factors that have an adverse impact on these species. Explores many aspects of what wildlife managers do to help insure the long term success of wildlife. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191.

NRES 330 Rangeland Plant ID (1-6)
Designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge to identify, collect and mount native and cultivated plants found in the rangelands of Northeastern Nevada. Students learn and demonstrate appropriate plant mounting protocol. This is a student self-paced course. May be repeated up to six credits.

NRES 375 Rangeland Watershed Management (3)
Advanced course investigating the study of rangeland watershed management. Includes soils, plant diversity and inventory, rangeland conditions, range site verification, archaeology, hydrology, wildlife, and livestock management as these pertain to a watershed and watershed management. Prerequisite: Must have completed NRES 150 and NRES 222 and NRES 241.

NRES 485 Special Topics in Environmental Science (1-3)
Presentation and review of recent research, innovations and developments related to natural resources management, hydrology, conservation biology, and environmental chemistry. May be repeated up to nine credits.

Nursing (NURS)
  
NURS 130 Nursing Assistant (6)
Provides students with classroom, laboratory, and clinical experience. Successful completion fulfills requirements for eligibility to take the Nevada State Certified Nursing Assistant examination. Contact the Department of Health Sciences and Human Services at 775.753.2301. Completed background check and drug screening wil be required prior to class start. Prerequisite: Proof of a current two-step TB test and Professional CPR certification is required. Instructor permission required.

NURS 135 Fundamental Concepts in Nursing (8)
Introduction to basic concepts and competencies for the application of the nursing process in the care of diverse patients with common health alterations and to promote the health of individuals. Introduction of basic concepts of safe, patient-centered, evidence-based nursing care considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse. Also introduces caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork when interacting with patients and members of the interprofessional team. Emphasis on essential psychomotor skills and obtaining patient information relevant to care planning. Five credits theory, three credits clinical. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 140 Medical Terminology (3)
A study of word derivations and formations with emphasis on understanding of common usage in the health-care setting. Offered as a self-paced class and is open to anyone.

NURS 154 Introduction to Pharmacology (1)
Basic principles of safe and effective medication administration and pharmacology of major drug classifications. Principles of medication administration including aspects of best practice for safe, quality, patient-centered care. Includes the use of informatics and media to obtain evidenced-based drug information. One theory credit. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 155 Clinical Decision Making in Drug Therapy (1)
Common drug therapy regimen and application of clinical reasoning in management and monitoring of drug effects in acutely ill patients for safe, quality, evidence-based nursing care. Focuses on patient teaching and the nurse as a member of the interprofessional team when providing pharmacological interventions. One credit theory. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 158 Nursing Care of Adults in Health and Illness (5)
Building on fundamentals of nursing, this course provides for the acquisition and application of basic adult health nursing theory by applying clinical reasoning and safe, evidence-based, patient-centered, holistic nursing care to diverse patients with common acute health problems. Incorporates a focus on health promotion. Includes the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for adults. Two credits theory, three credits clinical. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 159 Nursing Care of Individuals with Mental Health Problems (3)
Provides for the acquisition and application of mental health nursing theory for safe, evidence-based, patient-centered, holistic nursing care for diverse patients experiencing common acute and chronic mental health disorders and treatment modalities. Includes the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when working with patients with mental health disorders. Two credits theory, one credit clinical. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 252 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family (3)
Provides for the acquisition and application of maternal/child nursing theory for safe, evidence-based, family-centered nursing care for diverse patients. Includes a focus on health promotion and the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when working with the childbearing family. Two credits theory and one credit clinical. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 253 Nursing Care of Children and Adolescents (3)
Provides for the acquisition and application of pediatric nursing theory by applying clinical reasoning and safe, evidence-based, family-centered, holistic nursing care to diverse children and adolescents with acute and chronic health problems. Includes a focus on health promotion, and the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when caring for children and adolescents. Two credits theory and one credit clinical. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 257 Nursing Care of Adults with Acute and Chronic Illness (5)
Provides for the acquisition and application of adult health nursing theory by applying clinical reasoning and safe, evidence-based, patient-centered, holistic nursing care to diverse adults with acute illnesses and long-term management of chronic illnesses. Includes a focus on health promotion and the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse when working with adults. Three credits theory and two credits clinical. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 258 Patients with Complex Health Problems (4)
Provides for the acquisition and application of nursing theory for patients experiencing physiological crisis and end of life. Applies clinical reasoning and safe, evidence-based, patient-centered, holistic nursing care to diverse patients with complex health problems. Includes a focus on collaboration and care management, and the application of the concepts of caring, clinical reasoning, quality improvement, communication, and teamwork, considering legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse in the management of patients in crisis and at the end of life. Two credits theory, two credits clinical. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 273 Professional Development and Transition to Practice (2)
Provides for an examination of the impact of clinical microsystems and organizational culture on patient care delivery and nursing practice. Incorporates an analysis of professional development resources for nurses upon entry into practice to facilitate progress form novice to expert. Two credits theory. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 280 Evidence Based Practice for Quality Improvement Seminar (2)
This seminar course focuses on the study of collecting and using evidence as a tool for microsystem change and promotion of quality and safety in a variety of healthcare environments. Takes a project-focused approach to collaboration and problem-solving for quality improvement. One credit theory and one credit clinical. Offered spring semester only. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Nursing Program.

NURS 285 Selected Topics in Nursing (0.5-6)
Selected nursing topics offered for general interest and nursing continuing education. Not a required course. No prerequisite. Unlimited repeatability. Formerly NURS 285B, Selected Topics in Nursing) Instructor permission required.

NURS 303 Health and Physical Assessment (3)
Application of strategies and skills associated with history taking, physical examination, and psychosocial evaluation to assess the health-care needs of individuals across the lifespan.

NURS 312 Health Assessment and Health Promotion (3)
Explores assessment of the healthcare needs of diverse and underserved populations. The importance of the nurse in identifying health promotion and disease prevention issues for individuals and communities is explored. Refines and expands the nurse's perspective on health assessment through integration of an expanded knowledge base in ethnic and cultural variations, risk behaviors, and common health deviations of populations. Instructor permission required.

NURS 315 Self-Leadership and Professional Role Transition (4)
Focus is on strategies and reflective analysis related to establishing goals, managing time, setting priorities, dealing with stress, and utilizing human and material resources that support successful and timely completion of all BSN coursework requirements. Will assist the learner to integrate self-leadership strategies into their professional nursing practice. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 326 Transition to Professional Nursing (5)
This course serves as a bridge between the student's current views and those that are presented throughout the program related to the major program concepts and differentiates the baccalaureate program from the AD program at Great Basin College. The course provides an overview of the major areas of nursing studied in more depth throughout the RN and BSN program including: current healthcare systems including rural health and agencies serving undeserved populations; quality improvement; nursing research and evidence-based practice; collaborative relationships with the inerprofessional team; leadership principles and theories; and information management. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 335 Concepts in Professional Nursing Practice (4)
Examination of the historical, theoretical, economic, legal/ethical, cultural, and technological issues related to clinical nursing practice, professionalism, nursing education, and nursing research. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 336 Acute Health Nursing (Pathophysiology) (4)
Systematic exploration of normal and pathophysiological responses to states of health and illness. Examines internal and external defense systems, balance and regulation of body systems, and integration of these concepts in the assessment and management of patient problems. Four credits theory, zero credits clinical. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 337 Pathophysiology (3)
Explores the pathophysiologic processes associated with common chronic and acute health problems across the lifespan. Incorporates the influence of age, ethnicity, and cultural patterns on illness development and resolution. The evidence base supporting current knowledge of disease processes and common health problems is explored. Instructor permission required.

NURS 338 Acute Health Nursing (Pathophysiology) Practicum (6)
An application of theory, knowledge, and skills in assessing human functioning, pathophysiology, pharmacology, psychosocial, cultural variation, health-care resources, and person-environment relationships with respect to select nursing strategies for acutely ill individuals of all ages in variety of rural acute care settings. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be taking NURS 315 and NURS 335 and NURS 336 and have been accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 416 Introduction to Nursing Informatics (4)
An introduction to the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for effective delivery of patient care through application of clinical information systems. Emerging trends in information technology will be explored. Four credits theory, zero credits clinical.

NURS 417 Information Systems and Quality Management (4)
This course examines the role of information systems and quality improvement processes used to monitor and improve healthcare outcomes. Covers the use of information management to impact cost, safety, and coordination of care. Includes adaptations of information access and management in rural environments. Instructor permission required.

NURS 420 Evidence Based Pratice and Research in Nursing (3)
Introduces students to the nurse as an evolving scholar using the research process, including skills in interpreting published research findings, the science of nursing as the basis for best practices, and evidence based quality improvement measures in healthcare environments. Application of ethics, legal principles, and professional standards are considered when carrying out the research process. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be taking NURS 326 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 429 Population Focused Community Health Theory (4)
Synthesis of community and public health nursing concepts and theories for health promotion and disease prevention of rural communities and underserved populations. Application of nursing concepts to plan for health promotion and disease prevention of these populations. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 326 and NURS 420 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 436 Population Focused Community Health Practicum (4)
Students engage in experiential learning activities that focus on application of public/community health nursing concepts to promote optimum health and wellness for rural communities and underserved populations. Incorporates project-focused group work and interprofessional planning and intervention. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 326 and NURS 420 and NURS 429 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 437 Diversity and Healthcare Policy in Rural Environments (3)
Students explore the influence of diversity and healthcare policy on local, national and global issues of healthcare equity, access, affordability, and social justice. Incorporates an analysis of nursing practices that increase cultural competence, affect health policy resulting in improved healthcare access, and reduced health disparities. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 326 and NURS 420 and NURS 429 and NURS 436 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 440 Nursing Leadership in the 21st Century (4)
A writing intensive course which requires the integration and synthesis of previously learned theory, knowledge, and skills with contemporary leadership and management principles and theories, enabling learners to critically analyze a variety of societal, economic, political, and professional issues that influence nurses and nursing. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be taking NURS 303 and NURS 315 and NURS 335 and NURS 336 and NURS 429 and NURS 436 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 443 Nursing Leadership and Management Theory (4)
The course explores leadership and management concepts essential for professional nursing practice in current, diverse healthcare environments. Examines the responsibilities of the professional nurse as a leader within structured and unstructured healthcare systems working with the interprofessional healthcare team. Explores the cost of care, safety, legal guidelines, regulatory factors, and measurement of patient satisfaction. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 326 and NURS 420 and NURS 429 and NURS 436 and NURS 437 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 449 Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum (4)
Students engage in experiential learning activities that focus on application of leadership and management concepts, theories, roles, and evidence related to a leadership or management issue in a selected organization or clinical area. Involves collaboration with a preceptor and faculty member for project development and implementation. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 443 and be accepted to the RN-BSN program.

NURS 456 Senior Synthesis Seminar (5)
This major senior project course engages students in an in-depth exploration of practice area/issue, integrating the knowledge acquired in the liberal arts, science, and baccalaureate nursing courses. Students also identify areas of professional opportunities and continuing education as methods for engaging in life-long learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed NURS 326 and NURS 420 and NURS 429 and NURS 437 and NURS 443 and NURS 417 and NURS 449 and an elective nursing course (NURS 312 or NURS 337 or NURS 490).

NURS 490 Special Topics in Nursing (0-6)
Exploration of health issues of specific populations, or aspects of health care and nursing practice including disease prevention and health promotion. Instructor permission required.

Nutrition (NUTR)
  
NUTR 121 Human Nutrition (3)
An introductory nutrition course for the beginning student. Course will center on the major nutrients and their roles in maintaining good health. Students will learn to recognize well-balanced diets and acquire shopping tips and preparation techniques for optimum utilization of food dollars. Class includes four required labs. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 95 or higher or earned a satisfactory score in Accuplace, ACT, SAT for placement into MATH 96 or MATH 116.

NUTR 223 Principles of Nutrition (3)
Application of principles of nutrition. Concepts of nutrients, nutrient requirements, and nutritional changes associated with the aging process, infants to seniors.

Physical Education and Exercise (PEX)
  
PEX 129 Volleyball (1)
An introduction to the basic rules, skills, and strategies of volleyball. The individual skills of passing, setting, hitting, blocking, and serving will be taught through drill and game experience. Perimeter and rotation defenses will be covered. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 134 Rock Climbing (1)
Beginning rock climbing class: students will demonstrate safe and proper technique for belaying, including knots and basic anchor set up. Intermediate class: students are expected to have knowledge of basic skills so that they will be able to demonstrate safe, proper sport climbing, multi-pitch commands, repelling skills, and proper anchor set up in climbing with a partner/s. [S/U] Instructor permission required.

PEX 143 Karate (1-2)
An introduction to martial arts for beginners and a continuation of training for more advanced students. Students will learn martial art skills through the practice of basics, forms, and sparring. Together, with the self-defense aspect, the student will develop a sense of well being through the self-confidence produced by disciplined training. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 148 Tai Chi (1-2)
Tai Chi is an internal martial art and a set of self-practicing exercises. Because it is an internal martial art, it is used solely for self defense. It is comprised of four parts: mediation, warm-up exercises, Tai Chi Ch'uan movements, and cool-down exercises. By integrating these four parts, the student learns to combine each part of the body into a whole unit, exercising every muscle, joint, tendon, ligament, and especially the mind. Tai Chi can be used as a wellness program, an exercise program, and a relaxation program, all rolled into one. No special equipment required except for flat-bottomed shoes. Can be performed anywhere. Tai Chi teaches the student to live in harmony with oneself and nature. It is an art and is often called ""poetry in motion."" [S/U]

PEX 169 Yoga (1-2)
Participation in the various class offerings will increase the student's overall flexibility, enhance physical strength and stamina, increase heart and lung function, and nurture the health and well-being of beginning and experienced yoga practitioners. Correct structural alignment will be emphasized as well as linking movement with breath; effort with relaxation; and the mind, body, and spirit. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 170 Aerobics (2)
This course involves participating in physical activities in which each individual can achieve the benefits of realistic fitness goals through activities such as hi/low impact sessions, kickboxing, and interval and circuit training. Class can be modified for most fitness levels and conditions and is a great fat burner. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 172 Body Contouring and Conditioning (2)
Intended to enhance physical activity to improve overall health and quality of life. Students will learn knowledge of muscle groups, target heart rate, and the potential benefits of regular exercise which includes improved cardiovascular endurance, body composition, flexibility, muscular strength and improved body contour. Students will participate in aerobic activities, calisthenics and sculpting-isometric exercise, sports, conditioning, and flexibility training. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 180 Strength Training (2)
This class provides safe and effective conditioning of the body through muscular fitness training. This is often done with weight lifting, but can be accomplished through a variety of exercises such as Pilates. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 183 Weight Training (3)
The proper form and techniques of a lifting exercise will be taught in the beginning class section. The student will learn how to implement the different programs and methods to help them achieve their goals. Spotting techniques to enhance safety will be addressed. Additional sections are offered to help the student develop a stronger and improved physique. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 199 Special Topics in Recreation and Physcial Education (1-2)
Selection will depend on current interests and needs. Student Open Workout, Relaxation Techniques, and New Year's Resolution are some examples of selections in this category. Descriptions of individual Special Topics in Recreation will be found in the current class schedule. May be repeated three times. [S/U]

PEX 351 Teaching Physical Education in Elementary School (3)
Designed for elementary education majors and those in related fields. Emphasis is placed on the teaching and spotting of basic gymnastics and tumbling skills. Foundational concepts of balance, flexibility, spatial awareness, motor learning, and risk management will be covered.

Philosophy (PHIL)
  
PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
Basic problems in different areas of philosophy such as ethics, political theory, metaphysics, and epistemology. [H]

PHIL 102 Critical Thinking and Reasoning (3)
Covers nonsymbolic introduction to logical thinking in everyday life, law, politics, science, advertising; common fallacies; and the uses of language, including techniques of persuasion. [H*]

PHIL 129 Introduction to the New Testament (3)
Surveys New Testament books and related literature from a nondenominational perspective. Textual and literary criticism will be practiced, and the historical background of the authors and their writings will be considered. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 or have satisfactory score in accuplacer, ACT or SAT placement tests for ENG 102.

PHIL 145 Religion in American Life (3)
History and organization of major religious groups in America, with special attention given to the relationships between religious convictions and social issues such as minority rights, welfare, sexual mores, and political affiliation. [H]

PHIL 200 The Judeo-Christian Tradition (3)
The philosophy of Biblical religion in the Old and New Testaments. Includes Israelitic cosmology, monotheism, the prophets, the parables of Jesus, and the letters of Paul. [H]

PHIL 207 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3)
Readings and discussion of theories concerning the nature of society and political structure from classical and contemporary philosophers. (Formerly PHIL 207, Social and Political Philosophy) [H]

PHIL 210 World Religions (3)
The moral and religious views of world religions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. [H]

PHIL 361 Introduction to the Pauline Letters (3)
Students will study the writings of Paul, using the practices of literary criticism, historical criticism, textual criticism, and other modern method of literary study. Course material includes Saul of Tarsus as an historical figure, Paul in the book of Acts, an exegesis of each of Paul's letters, the collation and distribution of the Pauline corpus, the Acts of Paul, and the place of Paul in Christian tradition. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101.

Physics (PHYS)
  
PHYS 100 Introduction to Physics (3)
A concise treatment of the basic principles of physics. Includes mechanics, matter, electricity, magnetism, heat, sound, light, relativity, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or earned a satisfactory score in Accuplacer, ACT, or SAT for placement into MATH 120.

PHYS 107 Technical Physics I (3)
Investigates traditional topics of physics. Topics include mechanics, electricity, basic solid state components, optics, gases, hydraulics, fluids, and thermodynamics. This course provides a basic understanding of how physical systems are related and their technical applications. Hands-on labs, demonstrations, and calculations are an integral part of the course. (Formerly PHYS 107B, Technical Physics I) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 96 or higher.

PHYS 117 Meteorology (3)
Description of the behavior of the atmosphere with special emphasis on the physical processes involved in the weather.

PHYS 151 General Physics I (4)
Primarily for students in arts and science. Topics include kinematics, energy and momentum conservation, rotational dynamics, thermodynamics, fluids, harmonic motion, and sound. Laboratory experiments illustrate many of these fundamental principles. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 127 or higher.

PHYS 152 General Physics II (4)
A continuation of PHYS 151. Topics include electrostatics, circuits, magnetism, induction, AC circuits, electronics, light optics, special relativity, and an introduction in quantum theory. Lab included. Prerequisite: Must have completed PHYS 151.

PHYS 180 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (4)
A comprehensive, calculus-based physics course designed for advanced science and engineering students. Consists of intensive word problem solving covering topics of kinematics, vectors, forces, energy, momentum, rotation, angular momentum, equilibrium, elasticity, gravity, fluids, and oscillations. Lab included. (Formerly PHYS 180/180L, Engineering Physics I) Prerequisite: Must be taking MATH 181 or have completed MATH181 or higher.

PHYS 181 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II (4)
A calculus-based investigation of thermodynamic laws, kinetic theory, electric charge, field, potential, current, dielectrics, circuit elements, magnetic fields and materials, electromagnetic oscillations. Lab included. (Formerly PHYS 181/181L, Engineering Physics II) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 181 and PHYS 180.

PHYS 182 Physics for Scientists and Engineers III (4)
A calculus-based investigation of Faraday's laws and inductance, AC, EM waves, light, optical systems, interference, diffraction, polarization, relativity, quantum physics, atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei and radioactivity, elementary particles. Includes a weekly laboratory component. Prerequisite: Must have completed PHYS 181.

PHYS 483 Special Topics in Physics (1-3)
Topics of current interest which are not incorporated in regular offerings. Prerequisite: Must have completed PHYS 182.

Political Science (PSC)
  
PSC 100 The Nevada Constitution (1)
An introduction to the political history of Nevada through an in-depth examination of the basic law of the state, the Nevada Constitution as originally written and subsequently amended. Self-paced reading program. Course satisfies the Nevada Constitution requirement for out-of-state students who have already satisfied the three-credit U.S. Constitution requirement and are transferring into a GBC program.

PSC 101 Introduction to American Politics (3)
A survey of United States, national, state, and local governments with emphasis on the cultural aspects of the governing process. Satisfies the legislative requirement for the United States and Nevada Constitutions. (Formerly PSC 103, Principles of American Constitutional Government)

PSC 210 American Public Policy (3)
Analysis of the interplay of forces involved in policy making at all levels of American government. Study of the impact of policy on individuals and institutions.

PSC 231 World Politics (3)
Introduction to the study of international relations that stresses a systematic approach to world politics.

PSC 295 Special Topics in Political Science (1-3)
Course may utilize special emphasis topics/instructors or be offered as an individualized study format with directed readings. Classes will usually mirror offerings at other NSHE institutions. Unlimited repeatability. [S/U]

PSC 401F Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3)
Studies factors which shape basic political attitudes, circumstances which result in different kinds of political behavior, and psychological aspects of American government and politics in relation to public opinion in electoral politics, governance, and democratic theory. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101.

PSC 401Z Special Topics in American Government (3)
Analysis of selected research and topical issues of political systems. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101.

PSC 403C Environmental Policy (3)
An examination of environmental policy and environmental law including issues in policy formulation and implementation, the basic statutory and regulatory framework, and judicial interpretation of the law. (Formerly PSC 421, Environmental Policy) Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101.

PSC 403K Problems in American Public Policy (3)
Examination of American public policy frameworks and spectrum of the political characteristics, institutions, and dynamics associated with decision-making processes in American government. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSC 101.

Psychology (PSY)
  
PSY 101 General Psychology (3)
Survey of the discipline introducing psychological theories, research methods, and principles of behavior.

PSY 102 Psychology of Personal and Social Adjustment (3)
A study of personality and adjustment in normal persons. Adjustment techniques and reactions to frustration and conflict in the content of various social groups considered.

PSY 130 Human Sexuality (3)
Provides a practical, informational approach to this subject. Surveys the biological, cultural, and ethical aspects of human sexuality.

PSY 208 Psychology of Human Relations (3)
Explores the relationships between human beings and assists in the development of interpersonal communication skills which can be used personally and professionally.

PSY 233 Child Psychology (3)
An overview of the theories, stages, and development of the child. Provides a practical and informational view of a child's cognitive, social, and personality development.

PSY 234 Psychology Of Adolescence (3)
Examines psychological development during adolescence with emphasis on special problems in American society including drug abuse, pregnancy, and familial problems.

PSY 241 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (3)
An overview of abnormal psychology with emphasis on the symptomology, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major psychological disorders. Prerequisite: Must have completed PSY 101.

PSY 276 Aging in Modern American Society (3)
The psychological and sociological development and the changes attendant to the process of aging in society. The course presents theory and research in the field, implications for social policy, and discusses perspectives on death and dying. Also available as SOC 276.

PSY 290 Special Topics in Psychology (1-4)
Selected problems and conceptual issues in psychology. Issues selected will depend upon current interest of staff and students.

PSY 412 Motivation and Emotion (3)
Basic principles and theories of motivation and emotion. Examination of major themes and contemporary research in the field. Prerequisite: Must have completed PSY 101.

PSY 435 Personality (3)
Study of personality as a psychological construct with emphasis on its structure, development, and measurement. Prerequisite: Must have completed PSY 101.

PSY 460 Social Psychology (3)
Social and group factors affecting individual behavior. Topics include social perception, opinions, and attitudes; influence processes; and small group behavior. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including PSY 101.

Radiology (RAD)
  
RAD 101 Exploration of Radiology (0.5)
For students who are interested in becoming a radiological technologist. Designed to give basic knowledge of what a radiological technologist does and what careers are available in this field. The major learning outcome of this course is to help students determine if this is the right career choice for them. Formerly RAD 090B.

RAD 112 Patient Care and Medical Terminology (2)
Covers procedures and practices related to radiological technology with an emphasis in patient care, patient safety, and communication. Aseptic techniques and procedures used to maintain a sterile field is explained. The use of prefixes, suffices, roots, and medical terms will be covered. Previous Medical Terminology course is recommended but not required. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 116 Radiography I (3)
Learn radiology positioning and anatomy. Identify the anatomic structures that will be on an x-ray examination, pathology noted, and radiation safety measures that should be used. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 118 Electrical and Radiation Physics (3)
Provides knowledge of x-ray terminology and structure of x-ray circuitry, radiation production, radiation characteristics, and the photon interactions. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 124 Radiographic Photography and Techniques (3)
Covers processing of the radiographic image, from darkroom to computerized radiography. The principles and practices with manipulation of exposure factors to obtain acceptable image quality will be discussed at length. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 126 Radiography II (3)
A continuation of RAD 116. Reviews advanced radiology procedures, pathology noted on images, radio-pharmacology, and film critique. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 128 Imaging Equipment (3)
Review all the radiographic equipment used in imaging departments and the equipment works. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 198 Special Topics in Radiology (0.5-6)
Covers limited radiology technology procedures and practices related to radiology technology with an emphasis on improving quality, radiation safety, and patient positioning. Designed for students who work with radiology equipment and want to enhance their skills. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 225 Clinical Radiology I (7)
A planned clinical experience. Gives the student the opportunity to apply didactic education to work-related examinations under the supervision of a registered technologist. The student must demonstrate clinical competency to continue in the program. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 226 Clinical Radiology II (7)
A continuation of RAD 225. The student will continue to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to work experience. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 227 Clinical Radiology III (14)
A continuation of RAD 226. Further clinical experiences will take place in order to achieve required competency. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 238 Radiation Safety and Protection (2)
Course covers the ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) concept. It also includes the definitions and significance of radiation protection and the biological effects of radiation. National and state requirements will be discussed. Offered online. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

RAD 242 Radiography Quality Management (1)
A study of quality control methods pertaining to equipment and quality issues in the radiology department. Covers performance improvement studies and quality assurance programs in relationship to current health-care trends. Offered online. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Radiology Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Real Estate (RE)
  
RE 101 Real Estate Principles (3)
A general overview of the field touching on a variety of topics such as escrow, title work, contracts, appraising, and listings. It is designed to give the student a basic understanding of how the business operates. Can be taken concurrently with RE 103.

RE 103 Real Estate Law and Practice (3)
Includes 45 hours of instruction in real estate practices including land economics and appraising, land description, financing and insurance, escrows and closings, subdivisions and developments.

Sociology (SOC)
  
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology (3)
Sociological principles underlying the development, structure, and function of culture including society, human groups, personality formation, and social change.

SOC 275 Introduction to Marriage and the Family (3)
Prepares the student for contemporary issues or problems encountered in dating, courtship, marriage, and parenthood. Emphasis will be on changing roles within families, communications, and parent-child interactions.

SOC 276 Aging in Modern American Society (3)
The psychological and sociological development and the changes attendant to the process of aging in society. The course presents theory and research in the field, implications for social policy, and discusses perspectives on death and dying. Also available as PSY 276.

Spanish (SPAN)
  
SPAN 101 Basics of Spanish I (3)
Listening, reading, writing, and basic conversational skills. Building a vocabulary of Spanish-English words. (Formerly SPAN 101B, Spanish, Conversational I) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

SPAN 102 Basics of Spanish II (3)
A second semester of Conversational Spanish, designed to continue and improve the skills learned in the first semester. (Formerly SPAN 102B, Spanish, Conversational II) Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 101. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

SPAN 109 Spanish for Law Enforcement I (3)
Spanish for Law Enforcement is a comprehensive language course designed to provide functional Spanish language skills for law enforcement personnel/officers who have contact with Spanish speaking individuals. In addition, it includes language training pertinent to alert words, vital phrases of law enforcement operations and procedures. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

SPAN 111 First Year Spanish I (3)
Development of language skills through practice in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and structural analysis. Language practice required. [H*]

SPAN 112 First Year Spanish II (3)
A continuation of SPAN 111. Language practice required. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 111.

SPAN 199 Special Topics in Spanish (1-3)
Emphasizes intermediate to advanced speaking, reading, writing, and grammar skills in Spanish. Advanced-level Spanish will focus on reading literature excerpts with discussion in Spanish, with a continued review of previously learned grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on grammatically correct usage, pronunciation, and communication, with expanded vocabulary usage. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

SPAN 211 Second Year Spanish I (3)
Considers structural review, conversation and writing, and readings in modern literature. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 112.

SPAN 212 Second Year Spanish II (3)
A continuation of SPAN 211. [H*] Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 111 and SPAN 112 and SPAN 211.

SPAN 305 Spanish Composition (3)
The advanced student of Spanish will be exposed to a free-writing approach in the composition of essays in Spanish. Auxiliary activities will include vocabulary development and grammatical refinement as well as a grounding in and further review of Spanish grammar and the use of idiomatic speech. [H] Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 212.

SPAN 400 Practicum in Spanish in the Community (2)
Supervised experience as an interpreter or translator using Spanish for local agencies or schools. Prerequisite: Must have completed SPAN 212 and be taking SPAN 305.

Statistics (STAT)
  
STAT 152 Introduction to Statistics (3)
Includes descriptive statistics, probability models, random variables, statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, linear regression analysis, and other topics. Designed to show the dependence of statistics on probability. It is recommended that students have completed prerequisites within two years of enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed AMS 310 or MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher.

Land Surveying/Geomatics (SUR)
  
SUR 280 Fundamentals of Geomatics I (4)
A comprehensive study of angle measurement systems, taping, the traverse, differential leveling, profile leveling, plan and profile sheet, the circular curve, the vertical curve, the USGS 7.5 minute map, and elementary topographic mapping. The application of statistics to surveying, the assumptions underlying surveying on the plane, and reference surfaces are stressed in this course. In the laboratory portion of the course, students will make survey measurements, maintain a field book, and adjust survey data as appropriate. Weekly laboratory reports using the measured data to compute a survey product are required. Lecture+Lab: 3+3. Four semester hours. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 128 and be taking or have completed STAT 152 and CADD 121.

SUR 281 Fundamentals of Geomatics II (4)
A comprehensive study of the construction and calibration of the modern total station, instrument errors, face positions, survey astronomy, control leveling, calibration of the EDMI, large-scale topographic mapping, and the use of the data collector. In the laboratory portion of this course, students will apply the fundamental principles underlying total station instrument errors, EDMI calibration, astronomic observations for azimuth and large-scale topographic mapping. Weekly laboratory reports using measured data to compute a survey product are required. Lecture+Lab: 3+3. Four semester hours. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 280.

SUR 290 Introduction to Urban Development (4)
An introduction to the process of land development and construction layout. An emphasis is placed on those Nevada State Statutes that define the duties of the Professional Land Surveyor in the subdivision of land. The laboratory portion of the course provides practical exercises involving Topographic Mapping, ALTA/ACSM Title Surveys, Standards of Practice, Elevation Certificates, and Subdivision Design. Lecture+Lab: 3+3. Four semester hours. Prerequisite: Must have completed CADD 121.

SUR 320 GIS for Surveyors (3)
Reviews the basic concepts in the development and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course focuses on the application of GIS for land parcel management or the Land Information System (LIS). Applies measurement science to the collection of land information data and the development of the base map. Develops the legal issues associated with the development of land information systems. Introduces the concept of the cadastre and the history associated with land parcel management in the United States. Prerequisite: Must have completed GIS 205.

SUR 330 Introduction to Least Square Adjustment (3)
This course provides an introductory study of the concepts and mathematics involved in performing least squares adjustment of survey data. The student is introduced to the use of matrices to handle data, systems of linear equations, the use of the Taylor series to linearize equations, the principles of error propagation, and several methods used to fit survey data to mathematical and survey models. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 181.

SUR 340 Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (3)
Principals of photogrammetry and remote sensing as applied to surveying and mapping. Includes the mapping camera, the photograph, the stereo model, the strip and the block, and flight planning principles. The impact of the digital revolution on photogrammetry, image processing, and remote sensing principles are important topics covered in this course. (Formerly SUR 340, Photogrammetry.) Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH128 and be taking or have completed PHYS152.

SUR 360 Public Land Surveying System (3)
The U.S. Public Land Survey System (PLSS) as described in Official Government Survey Manuals (1851-1973) with emphasis on evidence, both federal and state rules, resurveys, and subdivision of sections. A field project to recover original evidence of the GLO Surveys is required. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or higher.

SUR 365 Land Descriptions (3)
Analysis, interpretation, and writing of land descriptions, proper form, controlling elements, metes-and-bounds, sectionalized land descriptions, easements, and right-of-way. Considerations of the parent title, interpretation of expressions, bounds calls, different types of descriptions, junior-senior rights in descriptions, title considerations, and research of public and private records. (Formerly SUR 365, Legal Descriptions.) Must have completed SUR 360. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 360.

SUR 440 Geodetic and GPS Surveying (3)
Introduces geometric reference to ellipsoids, ellipsoidal and local coordinate systems, coordinate transformation in 2D and 3D, datums and datum transformations, orthometric heights, the reduction of field observations, effects of the earth's gravitational field, state plane coordinate systems, and GPS network design. The student is expected to design a GPS network, collect the data, and process the data to extend control to unknown project control stations. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 281 and SUR 330 and PHYS 152.

SUR 450 Construction Surveying (3)
Prepares students for organizing, planning, and cost estimating for construction and civil engineering projects. Topics include intersections, horizontal curve, spiral curves, vertical curve fitting, route design elements, cross sections, volumes, and other pertinent topics. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 281 and SUR 290.

SUR 455 Mine Surveying (3)
Advanced surface and underground surveying techniques specifically applied to mineral exploration and mining operations. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 281.

SUR 460 Advanced Boundary Analysis (3)
Study of boundary resolution where occupation and possession are not consistent with the record location. Study of unwritten property rights and the presentation of defensible evidence. Review of principles of land tenure and the cadastre, the Statute of Frauds, constructive notice, recording laws, and water boundaries. Prerequisite: Must have completed SUR 365.

SUR 495 Land Surveying/Geomatics Capstone (3)
Final student project requiring the application of knowledge and skills acquired in previous field experience and coursework. Project may include field/office evidence research, urban subdivision layout, descriptions, map/plat construction, and/or a directed undergraduate research project. Includes the creation of a student portfolio or project report. Instructor permission required.

Social Work (SW)
  
SW 101 Introduction to Social Work (3)
Overview of the public and private social services and the social work profession including analysis of their functions as modes of social problem solving. (Formerly SW 220)

SW 230 Crisis Intervention (3)
Analysis of crisis theories, definition of crisis, what can cause crisis, effects of crisis, and resources for crisis, and resources for crisis intervention. Prerequisite: Must have completed PSY 101.

SW 250 Social Welfare History and Policy (3)
Explores the historical development of the social work profession and current policies governing the social service delivery system within the United States. Social policy is presented as a social construction influenced by a range of ideologies and interests. Special attention is paid to social welfare policy and programs relevant to the practice of social work, including poverty, child and family well-being, mental and physical disability, health, and racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. The course includes a focus on the role of policy in creating, maintaining or eradicating social inequities. Prerequisite: Must have completed SW 101.

SW 310 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)
Examines human development from conception through young adulthood from an ecological-systems approach using a biopsychosocial perspective. Theories related to typical and atypical biological, psychological, cognitive, and social development will be explored. In addition, theories regarding small groups, communities, and social organizations will be presented to focus on the interaction among the social, political, economic, biological, cultural, and environmental forces that come to bear on the growth and development of all individuals including minority groups, women, gays and lesbians, and other oppressed groups. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 and BIOL 100 and PSY 101 and SOC 101 and SW 101 and (ECON 102 or ECON 103) and ((HIST 101 nad HIST 102) or PSC 101).

SW 311 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3)
Examines human development from adulthood through old age and death as a continuation from SW 310, utilizing the same theoretical perspectives related to biological, psychological, cognitive, and social development. In addition, as in SW 310, theories regarding small groups, communities, and social organizations will be presented to focus on the interaction among the social, political, economic, biological, cultural, and environmental forces that come to bear on the growth and development of all individuals including minority groups, women, gays and lesbians, and other oppressed groups. Prerequisite: Must have completed SW 310.

SW 321 Basics of Professional Communication (3)
Focuses on the development of basic communication and observational skills needed for subsequent social work methods courses. Communication topics to be addressed include: active listening, questioning, empathetic responding, paraphrasing, summarizing, persuasive writing, and non-verbal communication. Emphasis will be placed on developing observation and communication skills that capture events in ways that are descriptive, accurate, and unbiased. Given the importance of nonjudgmental and unbiased communication to rapport, the course will examine the role of power differentials, gender, culture, class, context and ethnicity/race on professional communication. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 101 and ENG 102 and PSY 101 and SW 101.

Technical Arts (TA)
  
TA 100 Shop Practices (1-4)
An introduction to hand tool identification and proper use, shop safety, and other topics including screw thread, hydraulic hose, fitting identification, and measuring devices. Also available as DT 100. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

TA 108 Applied Math for Technicians (3)
Emphasizes the ability to understand and apply math to solve problems in society and the workplace. Topics include a review of whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, decimals and percentages, plus geometry, and formulae, basic right angle trigonometry, elementary statistics, probability, linear equations, and measurement methods. This course employs lecture, small group collaboration, and hands-on lab activities relating to student's major emphasis. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

TA 299 Special Topics in Technical Arts (1-5)
Consideration of special topics and issues in technical arts. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Theatre (THTR)
  
THTR 100 Introduction to Theatre (3)
A survey of the basic principles, facts, and theories providing an understanding of the art of theatre. Course also includes a special focus on the practical technical aspects of the theatre and on live theatre experiences. [H*]

THTR 102 Introduction to Stage Voice (3)
Fundamentals of voice production including relaxation, alignment, breath, resonance, and articulation. Vocal health and the physiological aspects of voice/speech production. Students complete numbers performance projects.

THTR 105 Introduction to Acting I (3)
Examines acting fundamentals and focuses on development of vocal, physical, and creative tools to be used on stage. Unlimited repeatability. [F*]

THTR 198 Special Topics (1-3)
Consideration of special topics and issues in speech. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. An additional emphasis provides for a responsive class which allows student actors from GBC, area high schools, and community theatres to work together on particular theatrical challenges. Unlimited repeatability.

THTR 205 Introduction to Acting II (3)
Continuation of THTR 105. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed THTR 105.

THTR 209 Theatre Practicum (1-6)
Performance and production of plays for GBC's Little Theatre season. [F]

THTR 221 Oral Interpretation (3)
Introduction to and practice of oral interpretation of literary and dramatic works from Shakespeare to contemporary writers and poets. [H]

THTR 306 Advanced Acting (3)
Offers an advanced approach to acting with an emphasis on character work, character analysis, rehearsal process, performance proficiency, and ensemble work. Students will continue development of technical skill, awareness, and fundamental understanding of acting through scenework, monologues, and specified techniques. Repeatable up to six credits. [F] Prerequisite: Must have completed THTR 105 or THTR 205.

Transport Technology (TT)
  
TT 109 Basic Driver Education (2)
Introduction to the laws, concepts, and practices of safe driving in Nevada. This course should lead to the student's ability to pass the Nevada Driver Written Examination. This is a classroom course without a driving component. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Welding (WELD)
  
WELD 105 Drawing and Weld Symbol Interpretation (3)
An introduction to the interpretation of basic elements of blueprints, sketches, and interpretation of welding symbols. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 110 Basic Arc Welding Principles and Practices (2.5-5.5)
Course provides students with the basic knowledge and understanding to complete fillet and groove welds in the 1G and 1F positions using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process on plain carbon steel. (15 contact hours per credit) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 115 Welding Inspection and Testing Principles (3)
Course will allow students to examine cut surfaces and edges of prepared base metal parts, examine tack, intermediate layers, and completed welds. Students will also study nondestructive testing examination (NDE) methods such as Magnetic Particle (MT), Liquid Penetrate (PT), Ultrasonic (UT), and Radiographic (RT) testing methods. (15 contact hours per credit) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 150 Metallurgy Fundamentals for Welding (3)
Explore the basic scientific theory as well as the practical side of metallurgy as it pertains to the welding field. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 160 Welding Design/Layout and Pipefitting (5.5)
A laboratory and lecture course in the design, layout, and construction of plate, pipe, and structural beams used in the fabrication and welding industries. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 198 Special Topics in Welding (1-6)
Consideration of special topics and issues in welding. Selection will depend upon current interests and courses may include pipefitting techniques, blacksmithing, ornamental iron work, other welding projects, and Tech Prep related theory. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 210 Advanced Welding Principles and Practices (5.5)
Course provides students with the advanced knowledge to produce high quality welds in all positions on plain carbon steel, using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Requires passing a 2G-3G limited thickness qualification test on plain carbon steel. (15 contact hours per credit) Prerequisite: Must have completed WELD 110. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 211 Welding I (3)
Introduction to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). Also includes oxy-fuel cutting. Shop safety is emphasized.

WELD 220 Gas Metal (GMAW) and Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) (11)
Course provides students with the knowledge to produce high quality welds in all positions on plain carbon steel, using the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) short circuit transfer mode and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes. Also requires use of the spray transfer mode for the 1F-2F and 1G positions on plain carbon steel. (15 contact hours per credit) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 221 Welding II (3)
A continuation of WELD 211 with emphasis on developing welding skills for arc welding in overhead, horizontal, and vertical positions. Does not include pipe welding. Prerequisite: Must have completed WELD 211.

WELD 224 Welding Projects (1-6)
Layout, fit up, and fabrication. Class provides an opportunity to use welding skills to produce any number of different projects. (15 contact hours per credit) [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 231 Welding III, Gas Metal and Flux Cored Arc Welding (3)
Provides training and hands-on welding experience in the welding process of Gas Metal (GMAW) and Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW).

WELD 240 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) (1-8)
Course provides students with the knowledge to produce high quality welds in all positions on plain carbon steel, aluminum, and stainless steel using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. (15 contact hours per credit) This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 241 Welding IV, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (3)
Provides training and hands-on welding experience in the welding process of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). [N] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 250 Welding Certification Preparation (1-6)
Through instruction and practice, this course prepares the student to pass one or more of the American Welding Society certification tests. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed WELD 210 and WELD 221. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WELD 260 Pipe Welding (8)
Course provides students with the knowledge of pipe welding principles using shielded metal arc welding processes. (15 contact hours per credit) Prerequisite: Must have completed WELD 210. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Womens Studies (WMST)
  
WMST 101 Introduction to Women's Studies (3)
Introduces the methods and concerns of women's studies drawing from history, psychology, sociology, law, and language.

Woodworking (WOOD)
  
WOOD 197 Beginning Woodworking (3)
Tool identification and uses, tools and machine safety, project design and construction, gluing, laminating, mechanical drawings, and sketches of three views. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

WOOD 221 Advanced Woodworking (3)
Advanced woodworking is a continuation of the skills and practices learned in beginning woodworking. The course is designed to meet the individual needs of the student through advanced woodworking construction practices which will be employed on an individual student need basis. Prerequisite: Must have completed WOOD 197. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.